The Hoy Family

The Hoy family in the Irish Annals

The Irish Annals were a set of documents written in Monasteries throughout Ireland starting around 600 AD. Like the Bible, the oldest versions are lost, but we have copies made for a period of 1,000 years until the last and most complete was finished in 1636. Before, and even after that, many of the copies were destroyed due to the occupation of the country by foreigners.

This page is a collection of the entries that refer to the surname Hoy in its various forms which changed through time. The earliest is for the year 1019 and the last for 1208. Before that, the surname did not exist, but the genealogy of the family is well documented and it is these men who are recorded in the Annals.

The death of Muireadhach in 489 is considered the first reliable event, but not the date. Saint patrick lived with him and his sons Eochaidh and Cairell.

The earliest spelling of the surname is Ua hEochaidh where Ua means 'descendant of', Eochaidh is a king's name (Eochaidh died in 1004) meaning Steedlike and the 'h' is used to not have two vowels together. The last spelling is O'Haughey, while a third is Ua hEochadha.

In the census of 1651, O'Hoy is listed as a principle surname in mid-Louth, while in late 18th century baptisms, it is always written Hoy. Starting after 1800, it came to be written Hoey which is now the most common in Ireland.

There are eight Annals listed here. For all of them, the later the date, the more accurate the entry. The entries before the time of Christ were attempts by the monks to join Irish history with Jewish and Greek history and cannot be taken as true.

The Annals of the Four Masters This is the most complete. The annals are mainly a compilation of earlier annals, although there is some original work. They were compiled between 1632 and 1636 at a Franciscan friary near the Drowes river, now in County Leitrim. They have entries from the Deluge to 1616,
The Annals of Tigernach The Annals of Tigernach is a chronicle probably originating in Clonmacnoise, Ireland. The language is a mixture of Latin and Old and Middle Irish. It has unique and important entries for the first millenium.
The Annals of Ulster The entries span the years from AD 431 to AD 1540. The entries up to AD 1489 were compiled in the late 15th century by the scribe Ruaidhrí Ó Luinín on the island of Belle Isle on Lough Erne in the province of Ulster. Later entries (up to AD 1540) were added by others. Previous annals dating as far back as the 6th century were used as a source for the earlier entries, and later entries were based on recollection and oral history. T.M. Charles-Edwards has claimed that the main source for its records of the first millennium AD is a now lost Armagh continuation of the Chronicle of Ireland. The Annals used the Irish language, with some entries in Latin. Because the Annals copied its sources verbatim, the annals are useful not just for historians, but also for linguists studying the evolution of the Irish language. A century later, the Annals of Ulster became an important source for the authors of the Annals of the Four Masters.
Chronicon Scotorum According to Nollaig Ó Muraíle, it is "a collection of annals belonging to the 'Clonmacnoise group', covering the period from prehistoric times to 1150 but with some gaps, closely related to the 'Annals of Tigernach'. It survives in a paper copy made by Dubhaltach MacFhirbhisigh c.1640 from an exemplar no longer extant."
The Annals of Inisfallen There are more than 2,500 entries spanning the years between AD 433 and AD 1450, but it is believed to have been written between the 12th and 15th centuries. It was written by the monks of Innisfallen Abbey, on Innisfallen Island on Lough Leane, near Killarney. Kathleen Hughes conjectured that the Annals are among those derived from the hypothetical Chronicle of Ireland.
The Annals of Loch Cé They cover events, mainly in Connacht and its neighbouring regions, from 1014 to 1590. It takes its name from Lough Cé in the kingdom of Moylurg - now north County Roscommon - which was the centre of power of the Clan MacDermot. For its earliest centuries it used the Annals of Boyle. The text is in Early Modern Irish, with a portion of the text in Latin.
MacCarthy's Book

Mac Carthaigh's Book is a collection of annals of the period AD 1114–1437 inclusive. It was compiled from earlier material by Fínghin Mac Carthaigh Mor (c. 1560–1640) an Irish nobleman who was imprisoned for years in London. Mac Carthaigh's Book is important as one of the few native records of events in southern Ireland for the period it covers and it provides us with some interesting information on the effect the Norman Invasion had on Munster. Besides relying on other Irish annals it drew upon some foreign sources, notably Giraldus Cambrensis' Expugnatio Hibernica.

The Fragmentary Annals of Ireland These are a Middle Irish combination of chronicle from various Irish annals and narrative history. They were compiled in the kingdom of Osraige, probably in the lifetime of Donnchad mac Gilla Pátraic (died 1039), king of Osraige and of king of Leinster.
Year Source Text
39 Four Masters "This Fiatach Finn (from whom are the Dá Fiatach in Uladh), after having been three years in the sovereignty of Ireland, was slain by Fiacha Finnfolaidh."
226 Four Masters "Fearghus Duibhdeadach, son of Imchadh, was king over Ireland for the space of a year, when he fell in the battle of Crinna, by Cormac, grandson of Conn, by the hand of Lughaidh Lagha. There fell by him also, in the rout across Breagh, his two brothers, Fearghus the Long Haired and Fearghus the Fiery, who was called Fearghus Caisfhiaclach of the Crooked Teeth. In the army of Cormac came Tadhg, son of Cian, and Lughaidh, to that battle; and it was as a territorial reward for the battle that Cormac gave to Tadhg the land on which are the Ciannachta, in Magh Breagh, as is celebrated in other books."
236 Four Masters "The battle of Granard by Cormac, the grandson of Conn, against the Ulstermen this year."
236 Four Masters A battle at Eth; the battle of Ceann Daire; the battle of Sruth against the Ulstermen; the battle of Slighe Cuailgne.
248 Four Masters A battle at Fochard Muirtheimhne by Cormac this year.
262 Four Masters "The battle of Crionna Fregabhail was fought by Cormac against the Ulstermen, where fell Aenghus Finn, son of Fearghus Duibhdeadach i.e. the Black Toothed, King of Ulster, with the slaughter of the Ulstermen about him"
267 Four Masters "Eochaidh Gonnat in the sovereignty of Ireland, when he fell by Lughaidh Meann, son of Aenghus, one of the Ulstermen"
331 Four Masters "The battle of Achadh Leithdheirg, in Fearnmhagh, was fought by the three Collas against the Ulstermen, in which fell Fearghus Fogha, son of Fraechar Foirtriun, the last king of Ulster, who resided at Eamhain. They afterwards burned Eamhain, and the Ulstermen did not dwell therein since. They also took from the Ulstermen that part of the province extending from the Righe and Loch nEathach westwards. Colla Meann fell in this battle."
356 Four Masters "After Muireadhach Tireach had been thirty years in the sovereignty of Ireland, he was slain by Caelbhadh, son of Crunn, King of Uladh, at Portrigh, over Dabhall."
488 Tigernach The rest of St Cianá of Duleek. It is to him that Patrick gave his gospels.
489 Tigernach The death of Muireadhach Redneck and his Eochaidh took the kingship of Ulaid.
491 Tigernach "Patrick archbishop and apostle of the Irish in the hundred and twentieth year of his life, on the 16th April rested. "
493 Chronicon Scotorum Battle of Dunlethglaise.
493 Four Masters "There was a rising of battle, and a cause of dissension in the province contending for the body of Patrick after his death. The Ui Neill and the Oirghialla attempting to bring it to Armagh; the Ulaid to keep it with themselves. And the Ui Neill and the Oirghialla came to a certain water, and the river swelled against them so that they were not able to cross it in consequence of the greatness of the flood. When the flood had subsided these hosts united on terms of peace, i.e. the Ui Neill and the Ulaid, to bring the body of Patrick with them. It appeared to each of them that each had the body conveying it to their respective territories, so that God separated them in this manner, without a fight or battle. The body of Patrick was afterwards interred at Dun Da Lethglas with great honour and veneration; and during the twelve nights that the religious seniors were watching the body with psalms and hymns, it was not night in Magh Inis or the neighbouring lands, as they thought, but as if it were the full undarkened light of day."
496 Tigernach The storming of Downpatrick.
496 Ulster The storming of Dún Lethglaise.
498 Ulster The storming of Dún Lethglaise.
503 Four Masters "Eochaidh, son of Muireadhach Muindearg, King of Uladh, died."
509 Tigernach Eochaidh son of Muireadhach died. Cairell son of Muireadhach Mundeirg in the kingship of Ulaid.
519 Ulster The birth of Colum Cille on the same day as Buite son of Bronach fell asleep.
520 Tigernach Buitte son of Bronach died.
520 Ulster Comgall of Bennchor was born according to some.
521 Inisfallen Birth of Colum Cille and the falling asleep of Buite, son of Brónach.
521 Four Masters "Saint Buite mac Bronaigh, bishop of Mainister, died on the 7th of December."
523 Ulster Buite son of Brónach died.
526 Four Masters "Cairell, son of Muireadhach Muindearg, King of Ulidia, died."
532 Tigernach "Eochaidh son of Connlac, king of Ulaid."
547 Four Masters "The King of Ulidia, Eochaidh, son of Connla, son of Caelbhadh, son of Crunn Badhrai, died."
548 Four Masters "The death of Eochaidh, son of Connlo, King of Ulidia, from whom are the Ui Eathach Uladh Tighernach."
551 Four Masters "Feargna, son of Aenghus, King of Ulidia, was slain in the battle of Druim Cleithe, by Deman, son of Caireall, and by the Ui Eathach Arda."
552 Tigernach "The death of Eochaid son of Connla, king of Ulaid, from whom the UíEachach of Ulaid descend."
552 Four Masters The church of Bennchar was founded by Comhgall of Beannchar.
552 Tigernach "Fergna son of Oengus, king of Ulaid."
553 Chronicon Scotorum Death of Eochu son of Conlaed king of Ulaid from whom are descended the Uí Echach Ulad. AU 553.
553 Ulster "Death of Eochu son of Conlaed i.e. king of Ulaid, in whom the Uí Echach Ulad originate; and death of Béc son of Deiche."
553 Ulster "I have found this in the Book of Cuanu: The relics of Patrick were placed sixty years after his death in a shrine by Colum Cille. Three splendid halidoms were found in the burial-place: his goblet, the Angel's Gospel, and the Bell of the Testament. This is how the angel distributed the halidoms: the goblet to Dún, the Bell of the Testament to Ard Macha, and the Angel's Gospel to Colum Cille himself. The reason it is called the Angel's Gospel is that Colum Cille received it from the hand of the angel."
555 Ulster The church of Bennchor was founded.
556 Tigernach "The battle of Druim Cleithe wherein Ferdia, grandson of Fidbad, king of Ulaid, fell by Deman son of Cairell and by the Uí Echach of the Ard."
557 Chronicon Scotorum The killing of Fergna son of Ibdach, king of Ulaid, in the battle of Druim Cleithe, by Demán son of Cairell and the Uí Echach of Ard. AU 557.
557 Inisfallen Death of Fergna, king of Ulaid.
557 Ulster "Death of Fergna or Fiacha descendant of Ibdach, king of Ulaid. Gerry - Demán killed him"
557 Ulster "Death of Fergna or Fiacha descendant of Ibdach, king of Ulaid."
557 Tigernach The church of Bennchar was founded.
558 Ulster "Death of Eochu son of Conlaed, king of Ulaid."
559 Ulster The church of Bennchor was founded.
563 Tigernach "Diarmaid son of Cearbhall was killed in Ráth Bec in Magh Line by Aodh Dubh son of Suibne Araidhe, king of Ulster, and his head was taken to Cluain and his body was buried in Connere. To whom two sons of Mac Earca succeeded i.e. Forgus and Domnall."
565 Chronicon Scotorum In this year the muirgeilt was captured, i.e. Lí Ban daughter of Eochu son of Muiredhach on the strand of Ollobra in the net of Baedán son of Innle, i.e. the fisherman of Comgall of Bennchor.
565 Chronicon Scotorum The slaying of Diarmait son of Cerball at Ráith Bec i.e. by Aed Dub son of Suibne Araide, i.e. king of Ulaid, and his head was brought to Cluain moccu Nóis and buried there and his body was buried in Coindire; and the two sons of mac Erca, Forgus and Domn
565 Four Masters "Deman, son of Cairell, King of Ulidia, son of Muireadhach Muindearg, was killed by the shepherds of Boirenn."
567 Tigernach The death of Deman son of Cairell king of Ulaid by the shepherds of Bairenn
567 Tigernach "Baedan son of Cairell, the king of Ulster."
568 Chronicon Scotorum The killing of Demán son of Cairell by the shepherds of Barrinne {Bairenn?}
572 Ulster Death of Demán son of Cairell.
575 Tigernach The first peril of Ulad in Eumania.
576 Tigernach The return of Ulaid from Euonia the Isle of Man.
577 Chronicon Scotorum The first expedition to the Ulaid to (Man).
577 Ulster The first expedition of the Ulaid to Man(?)
578 Chronicon Scotorum The return of the Ulaid to Emain.
578 Ulster The return of the Ulaid from Man(?).
579 Inisfallen he first expedition(?) of the Ulaid.
579 Tigernach "Baetán son of Cairell, king of Ulaid, died. Aodh Dub son of Suibne became king of Ulaid."
581 Chronicon Scotorum Baetán son of Cairell, king of Ulaid, died.
581 Ulster The death of Baetán son of Cairell.
583 Chronicon Scotorum Repose of Fergus bishop of Druim Lethglaise, who built Cell Biain.
584 Ulster "Repose of Fergus, bishop of Druim Lethglaise, who founded Cell Biain."
585 Chronicon Scotorum Repose of Mac Nisi of the Ulaid, abbot of Cluain moccu Nóis.
585 Four Masters "Baetan, son of Cairell, King of Ulidia, died."
587 Ulster "Or here the death of Baetán son of Cairell, king of Ulaid."
587 Tigernach "Fiacha son of Baedan, king of Ulster."
590 Four Masters "The battle of Eadan Mor was gained by Fiachna, son of Baedan, son of Cairell, son of Muireadhach Muindearg, over Gerthidhe, son of Ronan, Lord of Cianachta, of which was said: On the other occasion, when the soldiers of Baedan shall go into Breagh, The Cianachta shall be on the alert, they shall not be the next to the shot."
592 Four Masters "Aedh Dubh, son of Suibhne, King of Ulidia, was slain by Fiachna, son of Baedan. It was by this Aedh Dubh Diarmaid Mac Cearbhaill had been slain."
594 Ulster "The battle of Gerrthide, king of Ciannachta. At Éudann Mór it was won. Fiachna son of Baetán Fiachna son of Baetán son of Cairell son of Muiredach Muinderg was victor."
597 Four Masters "The battle of Cuil Cael, by Fiachna, son of Baedan, against Fiachna, son of Deman; and the battle was gained against Fiachna, son of Deman."
600 Four Masters "St. Comhgall, of Beannchair, abbot of Beannchair Uladh, died on the tenth day of the month of May, after having been thirty years, three months, and ten days, in the abbacy of Bangor. His age was ninety years."
600 Tigernach "Comgall abbot of Bennchor in the 91st year of his age, but in the 50th year and 3rd month and 10th day on the Ides of May rested."
602 Chronicon Scotorum Comgall, abbot of Bennchor, rested in the 91st year of his age, and 50th year and 3rd month and 10th day of his abbacy; he rested on the 6th of the Ides of May.
602 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Cúil Cáil in which Fiachna son of Baetán was victor. Fiachna son of Demán fled.
602 Ulster Repose of Comgall of Bennchor.
602 Ulster The battle of Cúil Caíl in which Fiachna son of Demán took flight. Fiachna son of Báetán was victor.
603 Tigernach "The death of Brandub son of Eochaid by his own son in law, i.e. Sará Saebderc, the erenagh of Senboth Sine. If the son of Eochaid son of Muireadach were in a pillared house."
604 Tigernach The death of the sons of Baetán son of Cairell by the son of his mother.
605 Inisfallen Repose of Comgall of Bennchor
609 Tigernach An army of Ulaid in Bairche was struck with a terrible stroke.
611 Chronicon Scotorum The army of Ulaid was struck by terrible thunder in Bairche.
611 Ulster The army of the Ulaid was struck by terrible thunder in Bairche.
611 Four Masters The church of Beannchair Uladh was burned.
612 Inisfallen Lightning destroys the army of Ulaid.
614 Tigernach The burning of Bennchor.
616 Ulster The burning of Bennchor.
617 Inisfallen The burning of Bennchor of Ulaid
622 Four Masters "The battle of Lethed Midinn, at Drung, was fought by Fiachna, son of Deman, Lord of Dá Fiatach, against Fiachna, son of Baedan, King of Ulidia. The battle was gained over Fiachna, son of Baedan, and he fell therein."
624 Four Masters "The battle of Ard Corainn was gained by Connadh Cerr, Lord of Dá Riada, where Fiachna, son of Deman, King of Ulidia, was slain"
626 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Leithet Midind in which Fiachna son of Baedán, i.e. the king of Dál Araide, was killed. Fiachna son of Demán i.e. the king of Dál Fiachach, was victor.
626 Ulster The battle of Leithet Midind in which Fiachna of Lurga fell. Fiachna son of Demán was victor.
627 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Ard Corann won by the Dál Riata in which fell Fiachna son of Demán by the king of Dál Riata.
627 Ulster The battle of Ard Corann in which fell Fiachna son of Demán: the Dál Riata were victors
628 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Fid Eoin in which Mael Caích son of Scannal i.e. the king of the Cruithin was victor. The Dál Riata fell, and Díucaill son of Eochu king of the Cruithin people fell, and Aedhan's descendants, i.e. Rigullan son of Conaing and Faelbhe son of Eochaid and Oric son of Albirit, heir designate of Saxan, with a great slaughter of their followers.
634 Four Masters "The battle of Magh Rath was gained by Domhnall, son of Aedh, and the sons of Aedh Slaine, over Congal Claen, son of Scannlan, King of Ulidia, where fell Congal, and the Ulidians and foreigners along with him."
637 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Mag Roth won by Domnall son of Aed and the sons of Aed Sláine but Domnall son of Aed ruled Temair at that time, in which fell Conall Caech king of Ulaid and Faelchú son of Airmedach king of Mide in a counterattack, with many nobles.
638 Chronicon Scotorum The killing of Congal son of Dúnchad
639 Tigernach "The battle of Moira gained by Domhnall son of Aodh and by the sons of AodhSláine but Domhnall ruled Temoria at that time in which fell Congal Caoch king of the Ulaid and Faelchú with many nobles, among whom fell Suibhne son of Conall Caech."
643 Four Masters "Dunchadh, son of Fiachna, son of Deman, King of Ulidia, died."
646 Four Masters "Maelcobha, son of Fiachna, son of Deman, King of Ulidia, was slain by Congal Ceannfoda, son of Dunchadha."
647 Chronicon Scotorum Mael Cobo son of Fiachna, was killed, i.e. the king of Ulaid, by Congal Cennfada son of Dúnchad.
647 Inisfallen Death of Mael Coba, son of Fiachra, at the hands of Congal Cennfhata
647 Ulster "Mael Cobo son of Fiachna, king of Ulaid, was killed."
648 Tigernach "Maol Cobha son of Fiachna, kign of Ulster, was killed by Congal Cennfhada son of Dunchadh. and his colour was like Unto the cloak. To Dunchadh."
649 Four Masters "Aedh Roin, son of Maelcobha, died."
653 Chronicon Scotorum Aed Rón son of Mael Cobo died.
654 Tigernach Aodh Róin son of Maol Cobha died.
656 Four Masters "Blathmac, son of Maelcobha, King of Ulidia, died."
658 Chronicon Scotorum Death of Cellach son of Mael Cobo in the Brug.
658 Four Masters "Faelan, chief of Osraighe, was slain by the Leinstermen."
665 Chronicon Scotorum Blathmac, king of Tethba, Oengus of Ulaid and Manchán of Liath, bishops and abbot, and innumerable kings, died.
665 Ulster "Blamac of Tethba, Aengus of Ulaid, Manchán of Liath, bishops and abbots, and innumerable others, died."
665 Four Masters "The battle of Fearsat, between the Ulidians and the Cruithni, where Cathasach, son of Laircine, was slain."
666 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Fertas between the Ulaid and the Cruithin, in which fell Cathasach son of Luircéne.
666 Four Masters "Blathmac, son of Maelcobha, King of Ulidia, died."
666 Tigernach "The battle of Belfast between the Ulaid and the Picts, in which fell Cathasach son of Luirchine."
668 Fragments The battle of Fertas between the Ulaid and the Cruithne, in which Cathassach son of Luirgne fell.
668 Ulster "The battle of Fertas between the Ulaid and the Cruithin, in which Cathusach son of Luirgéne fell."
670 Chronicon Scotorum Death of Blathmac son of Mael Cobo and the killing of Cuanu son of Cellach.
670 Fragments The death of Blathmac son of Máel Coba, king of Ulaid.
670 Inisfallen Death of Forchellach, king of Éile, and of Blathmac, son of Mael Coba; and Oswald, king of the Saxon, rested in Christ.
670 Tigernach The death of Blathmac son of Maol Coba and the killing of Cuana son of Maol of Cellach.
670 Four Masters Beannchair was burned.
672 Inisfallen Death of Congal Cennfhata, son of Dúnchad.
673 Chronicon Scotorum The killing of Congal Cennfhata son of Dúnchad, king of Ulaid. Béc of Bairche killed him.
673 Four Masters "Congal Ceannfoda, son of Dunchadh, King of Ulidia, was slain by Beag Boirrche."
674 Fragments The slaying of Congal Cendfhota son of Dúnchad, king of Ulaid. Bécc Bairche killed him
674 Tigernach "The slaying of Congal Longhead son of Dunchadh, king of Ulster, by Béc Boirche, son of Blaithmec."
674 Ulster "The killing of Congal Cennfhatar son of Dúnchad, king of Ulaid. Béc of Bairche killed him."
678 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Fínnechta against Béc of Bairche
679 Fragments A battle between Fínnachta and Bécc Bairche.
679 Ulster The battle of Fínnechta against Béc of Bairche.
679 Ulster Domnall son of Suibne dies among the Ulaid.
685 Inisfallen A great battle between the Picts.
687 Four Masters Ard Macha was burned.
689 Four Masters "Fearghus, son of Lodan, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ui Eachdhach people of Iveagh."
691 Ulster The Dál Riata despoiled the Cruithin and the Ulaid.
692 Fragments Fergus son of Áedán, king of the Province Ulaid, died.
695 Four Masters The devastation of Magh Muirtheimhne by the Britons and Ulidians.
697 Fragments The Britons and the Ulaid plundered Mag Muirtheimne.
697 Tigernach Britons and Ulstermen laid waste the field of Murthemne.
697 Ulster Britons and Ulaid wasted Mag Muirtheimne.
703 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Mag Cuillinn in Ard Ua nEchdach, between the Ulaid and the Britons, in which Radgann's son, an enemy of God's churches, fell. The Ulaid were victors.
703 Fragments The battle of Mag Cuilinn between the Ulaid and Britons in Ard Úa Echdach, in which the son of Radgund, enemy of God's Church, fell. The Ulaid were the victors.
703 Tigernach "The battle of Magh Cuilinn in Aird Ua nEachach between the Ulstermen and Britons, in which fell the son of Radhgann, the adversory of the churches of God. The Ulstermen were victors."
703 Ulster "The battle of Mag Cuilinn in Ard Ua nEchdach between the Ulaid and the Britons, in which Radgann's son, an enemy of God's churches, fell. The Ulaid were victors."
704 Four Masters "Beg Boirche, King of Ulidia, took a pilgrim's staff, and died on his pilgrimage at the end of twelve years afterwards."
706 Four Masters "Cucuaran, King of the Cruithni and of Ulidia, was killed by Finnchu hUa Ronain."
707 Ulster The pilgrim's staff assumed by Béc of Bairche.
708 Chronicon Scotorum Cú Chuaráin, king of the Cruithin and the Ulaid, was killed. Finchú ua Rebáin slew him.
712 Four Masters "A battle was fought between the two sons of Beg Boirche and the sons of Breasal, chiefs of Ui Eathach Uladh Iveagh; and the victory was gained over the sons of Breasal."
712 Tigernach "The Ulaid were prostrate, where Dubhthach son of Becc Boirche lay dead."
712 Ulster The Ulaid were overthrown and Dubthach son of Béc of Bairche fell therein.
714 Tigernach "A battle between two sons of Becc Boirche and the son of Bresal king of Uí Echach, in which the victors were the sons of Becc."
714 Ulster "A battle between two sons of Béc of Bairche and Bresal's son, king of Uí Echach, and the victors therein were Béc's sons."
716 Four Masters Becc Boirche died.
718 Chronicon Scotorum Béc of Bairche died.
718 Tigernach Becc Boirchi dies
718 Ulster Béc of Bairche dies.
718 Tigernach Connri son of Congail Cennfhada and Ailill son of Finnachta were butchered.
725 Tigernach Flight of the Ulaid before Cinaeth son of Irgalach.
732 Four Masters "The battle of Fochart, in Magh Muirtheimhne was fought by Aedh Allan and the Clanna Neill of the North, against the Ulidians, where Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, was slain; and his head was cut off on Cloch An Chommaigh, in the doorway of the church of Fochard; and Conchadh, son of Cuanach, chief of Cobha, was also slain, and many others along with him. The cause of this battle was the profanation of Cill Cunna by Ua Seghain, one of the peaple of Aedh Roin, of which Aedh Roin himself said: 'I will not take its Conn from Tairr,' for Ceall Cunna and Ceall Tairre are side by side."
732 Four Masters "Congus, successor of Patrick, composed this quatrain, to incite Aedh Allan to revenge the profanation of the church, for he was the spiritual adviser of Aedh, so that he said: Say unto the cold Aedh Allan, that I have been oppressed by a feeble army; Aedh Roin insulted me last night at Cill Cunna of the sweet music."
732 Four Masters "Aedh Allan collected his forces to Fochard, and Aedh Allan composed these verses on his march to the battle: For Cill Cunna, the church of my confessor, I take this day a journey on the road; Aedh Roin shall leave his head with me, or I shall leave mine with him."
732 Four Masters "Of the same battle was said: The slaughter of the Ulidians with Aedh Roin was made by Aedh Allan, King of Ireland; For their coigny at Cill Cunna he placed soles to necks."
733 Four Masters "Breasal, son of Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, was slain at Dun Celtchair."
735 Fragments Áed Alláin defeated the Ulaid in a battle in which Áed Rán, king of the Ulaid, and Conchad, king of the Cruithne, fell, at Fochart Muirtheimne; Áed Rón's thumb is in the church at Fochart.
735 Tigernach "The battle of Faughard in the regions of Murthemne, between the race of Niall and the Ulaid, wherein Aodh Roin -- he was taken into the oratory of Faughard to be killed -- and Conchad son of Cuana king of Coba fell. Aodh Allan son of Fergal was victor."
735 Ulster "A battle in the territory of Muirtheimne between the Uí Néill and the Ulaid, in which Aed Rón, king of Ulaid, and Conchad son of Cuanu, king of Cuib, fell. Aed son of Fergal was victor."
739 Four Masters "The sea cast ashore a whale in Boirche, in the province of Ulster. Every one in the neighbourhood went to see it for its wondrousness. When it was slaughtered, three golden teeth were found in its head, each of which teeth contained fifty ounces. Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, and Eochaidh, son of Breasal, chief of Ui Eathach Iveagh, sent a tooth of them to Beannchair, where it remained for a long time on the altar, to be seen by all in general."
744 Tigernach "A strange sign was manifested in Boirche, in the time of Fiachna son of Aedh Ron, king of the Ulaid, and in the time of Eochaidh son of Bresal king of the Ua­ Echach, to wit, a whale which the sea cast to land with three golden teeth in its head and fifty ounces in each of these teeth, and one of the teeth was taken, and remained on the altar of Bennchor for a long time."
747 Tigernach "The death of Muredach the Fair, king of theHui ­ Meith, in Cuill Cumaisc, by the Ulaid."
749 Four Masters "Cathasach, son of Ailell, King of Ulidia, was slain at Rath Bethech."
750 Ulster "The killing of Fiachra son of Ailéne, king of Mugdorna, and of Bresal son of Aed Rón."
753 Ulster "A whale was cast ashore in Bairche in the time of Fiachna son of Aed Rón, king of Ulaid. It had three gold teeth in its head, each containing fifty ounces, and one of them was placed on the altar of Bennchor this year, that is, in AD 752."
754 Four Masters "The battle of Eamhain Macha was gained by Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin, over the Ui Neill, wherein were slain Dunghal Ua Conaing and Donnbo."
756 Tigernach The burning of Bangor the Great on the feast of Patrick.
756 Four Masters "The battle of Ath Dumha was fought between the Ulidians and Ui Eathach people of Iveagh, in which Ailill, son of Feidhlimidh, lord of Ui Eathach, was slain."
759 Inisfallen A battle between the Uí Néill and the Ulaid at Emain Macha, in which Dúngal, grandson of Conaing, ... fell. Fiachra, king of Ulaid, was victor.
759 Tigernach "The battle of Emain Macha between the Ulaid and the Ua Néilll, with Airechtach the priest of Armagh pushing in discord with the abbot of Fer da Crich, where Dungal grandson of Conaing and Donn Bo were killed. Fiachna son of Aodh Roin was victor."
759 Ulster The battle of Emain Macha in which Dúngal grandson of Conaing and Donn Bó were slain. Fiachna son of Aed Rón was victor.
761 Tigernach "Battle of Ath duma between the Ulaid and the Uí Echach, in which fell Ailill son of Fedlimid."
761 Ulster "The battle of Áth Duma between the Ulaid and the Uí Echach, in which Ailill son of Feidlimid fell."
784 Ulster A royal meeting between Donnchad son of Domnall and Fiachna son of Aed Rón at Inis na Ríg in eastern Brega.
785 Four Masters "Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin, King of Ulidia, died."
787 Four Masters "Tomaltach, son of Innreachtach, King of Ulidia, was slain by Eochaidh, son of Fiachna."
789 Ulster "Fiachna son of Aed Rón, king of Ulaid, dies."
789 Ulster A battle between the Ulaid themselves in which Tomaltach son of Cathal fell. Echaid was victor.
790 Ulster A great slaughter of the Ulaid by the Dál nAraidi.
796 Four Masters "A battle between the Ulidians and the Ui Eathach Cobha, wherein Eochaidh, son of Ailell, lord of Cobha Iveagh, was slain."
801 Ulster "A battle between the Ulaid and the Uí Echach Cobha, in which Echu son of Ailill, king of Cuib, fell, and on the opposing side in battle Cairell son of Cathal fell; and his army was victorious."
804 Four Masters "A battle by the Ulidians between the two sons of Fiachna, and Cairell defeated Eochaidh."
804 Four Masters "The plundering of Ulidia by Aedh Oirdnidhe, the king, in revenge of the profanation of the shrine of Patrick, against Dunchu."
807 Four Masters "Eochaidh, son of Fiachna, son of Aedh Roin, and Caireall, his brother, gave battle to each other, in which Eochaidh was defeated."
809 Ulster "The invasion of Ulaid by Aed son of Niall, as a result of the profanation of Patrick's shrine to the dishonour of Dúnchú. "
809 Ulster A battle among the Ulaid between two sons of Fiachna. Cairill was victor. Echaid escaped.
810 Ulster "Cathnia, abbot of Dam Liac, and Tigernach, founder of Daire Meilli, abbot of Cell Achaid, and Mael Fothartaig son of Aedgal, superior of Airecal Do-Chiaróc, scribe, Cathal son of Fiachra, king of Ráith Airthir and Fir Chúl, and Echaid son of Fiachna, king of Ulaid, and Mael Dúin son of Donngal, steward of Ard Macha, Anluan son of Conchobor, king of Aidne, Mac Coirb son of Neuter, and Cellach grandson of Cú Chodaig, died."
811 Chronicon Scotorum A slaughter of the heathens by the Ulaid.
811 Ulster A slaughter of the heathens by the Ulaid.
816 Four Masters "A battle between the Ulidians themselves, in which Caireall, son of Fiachna, King of Ulidia, was slain by Muireadhach, son of Eochaidh."
819 Chronicon Scotorum The laying waste of Laigin by Aed son of Niall. The death of Aed son of Niall Frosach at Áth Dá Ferta in the Plain of Conaille.
819 Ulster "A skirmish between the Ulaid themselves, in which Cairell son of Fiachna fell and Muiredach son of Eochu was victor."
819 Ulster At Ard Macha Whitsun 5 June was not publicly celebrated nor the shrine taken on tour; and there was a disturbance in which the son of Echaid son of Fiachna fell.
823 Chronicon Scotorum Heathens invaded Bennchor the great.
823 Four Masters Dun Da Leathghlas was plundered by the foreigners.
823 Four Masters "The burning by them, moreover, of Magh Bile, with its oratories, and the plundering of Inis Doimhle."
823 Four Masters "A battle was gained in Magh Inis Lecale by the Ulidians over the foreigners, wherein many were slain."
823 Four Masters "Maelbreasail, son of Ailell Cobha, lord of Dá Araidhe, died."
824 Chronicon Scotorum The Ulaid inflicted a rout on the heathens in Mag Inis, in which very many fell.
824 Chronicon Scotorum The burning of Mag Bile with its oratories by the heathens.
824 Chronicon Scotorum The plunder of Bennchor by heathens.
824 Chronicon Scotorum The plundering of Dún Lethglaise by the heathens.
825 Ulster Dún Lethglaise was plundered by the heathens.
825 Ulster "The Ulaid inflicted a rout on the heathens in Mag Inis, in which very many fell."
827 Chronicon Scotorum The short of it is, the kings assemble their armies and the battle of Leth Cam in Mag Enir is given by Niall son of Aed against the Airgialla and the Ulaid, in which fell Muiredach, son of Eochu, king of Ulaid, and Cumuscach son of Cathal, king of Airgialla, and Congalach his brother, and other kings of the Airgialla
827 Ulster "The battle of Leth Cam won by Niall son of Aed against the Uí Chremthainn and Muiredach son of Echaid, king of Ulaid, in which fell Cumuscach and Congalach, two sons of Cathal, and many other kings of the Airgialla."
835 Inisfallen Indrechtach, son of Tomaltach, one of the two kings of Ulaid, [dies].
835 Ulster Cinaed son of Niall son of Aed was killed by the Ulaid.
838 Four Masters "Muireadhach, son of Eochaidh, son of Fiacha, King of the province of Conchobhar, was killed by his brothers, Aedh and Aenghus, with many others besides them."
838 Four Masters "Aedh, son of Eochaidh, was killed by Madadhan, son of Muireadhach."
839 Chronicon Scotorum Muiredach son of Echaid, king of Ulaid, was killed by his own kinsmen, i.e. by Aed and Óengus, and others.
839 Ulster "Muiredach son of Echaid, king of Conchobor's Province, was killed by his own kinsmen, i.e. by Aed and Aengus, and many others."
841 Four Masters "A fleet of Norsemen on the Boinn, at Linn Rois. Another fleet of them at Linn Saileach, in Ulster. Another fleet of them at Linn Duachaill."
842 Ulster A naval force of the Norsemen was on the Bóinn at Linn Rois. There was also a naval force of the Norsemen at Linn Sailech in Ulaid.
851 Chronicon Scotorum A royal conference in Ard Macha between Mael Sechnaill, accompanied by the nobles of Leth Cuinn, and Matudán with the nobles of Conchobor's Province, and Diarmait and Fethgna with the congregation of Patrick, and Suairlech with the clerics of Mide.
851 Fragments A royal gathering of the men of Ireland in Ard Macha, between Máel Sechlainn and Matudán, king of Ulaid, and Diarmait and Fethgna with the congregation of Patrick, and Suairlech of Indeidnén with the clergy of Mide.
851 Four Masters "Cathmal, son of Tomaltach, half king of Ulidia, was killed by the foreigners."
852 Fragments At this time Zain, one of the two kings of the Norwegians, and Matudán, king of Ulaid, came to ravage the Danes on sea and land; although Zain the Norwegian had not known about that before, he came, along with the small number who had accompanied him, to attack the Danes on one side, and Iargna, the other king of the Norwegians, came against the Danes from the other side. Then the battle was fought hard. The shrieking of the javelins, and the crashing blows of swords, and the hammering of shields being struck, and the cries of soldiers being overcome, were loudly audible. Though it lasted a long time, it was the Norwegians who were defeated, and the Danes took victory and spoils, by grace of Patrick, although the Norwegians were three or four times the number of the Danes.
853 Chronicon Scotorum Cathal son of Tomaltach, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by the Norsemen.
853 Four Masters "A hosting was made by Aedh, son of Niall, into Ulidia, where he lost Connegan, son of Colman, and Flaithbheartach, son of Niall, and many others besides."
853 Ulster "Cathmal son of Tomaltach, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by the Norsemen."
854 Chronicon Scotorum Aed son of Niall made a foray against the Ulaid, and he left behind dead Coinnecán son of Colmán and Flaithbertach son of Niall and a large number besides.
855 Fragments A raid by Áed son of Niall to plunder Ulaid, but nevertheless he did not accomplish that easily, for the Ulaid routed Cenél Eógain, and Flaithbertach son of Niall and Conacán son of Colmán were slain there, along with many others.
855 Ulster "Aed son of Niall made a foray against the Ulaid, and he left behind dead Coinnecán son of Colmán and Flaithbertach son of Niall, and a large number besides "
855 Four Masters "Matudan, son of Muireadhach, King of Ulidia, died in religion."
857 Chronicon Scotorum Matudán son of Muiredach, king of Ulaid, dies.
857 Fragments Matudán son of Muiredach, king of Ulaid, died in orders
857 Ulster "Matudán son of Muiredach, king of Ulaid, dies "
862 Four Masters "A great victory was gained by the king, Aedh Finnliath, and by Flann, son of Conang, over Anbhith, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, with the Ulidians, in the territory of Conaille Cerd. (Louth)"
864 Chronicon Scotorum Aed son of Niall and Flann son of Conaing gained.a great victory over Ainbíth son of Aed and the Ulaid in the territory of the descendants of Conall the Craftsman.
864 Ulster Aed son of Niall and Flann son of Conaing gained a great victory over Ainbíth son of Aed and the Ulaid in the territory of the descendants of Conall the Craftsman.
869 Four Masters "Cathal, son of Innreachtach, half king of Ulidia, was killed at the request of the king, Aedh."
871 Chronicon Scotorum Cathalán son of Indrechtach, one of two kings of Ulaid, was treacherously killed at the instigation of Aed.
871 Ulster "Cathalán son of Indrechtach, one of two kings of Ulaid, was deceitfully killed at the instigation of Aed."
871 Four Masters "Leathlobhar, son of Loingseach, King of Ulidia, died, after a good life."
878 Ulster "Gairbíth son of Mael Brigte, king of Conaille, was beheaded by the Uí Echach."
879 Four Masters "A battle was gained by the Conaille Muirtheimhne, with their lord Gibhleachan, over the Ulidians, wherein fell Ainbhith, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia; and Conallan, son of Maelduin, lord of Cobha; and other nobles along with them."
881 Four Masters "Ainbhith, son of Aedh, son of Madagan, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Conaille Muir Theimhne."
882 Chronicon Scotorum A battle bctween the Conaille of Muirtheimne and the Ulaid in which fell Ainfíth son of Aed king of Ulaid, and Conall son of Mael Dúin, king of Cuib, and others.
882 Ulster "A skirmish between the Conaille of Muirtheimne and the Ulaid, in which fell Ainfíth son of Aed king of Ulaid, and Conallán son of Mael Dúin, king of Cuib, and other nobles. The Conaille were victors."
882 Ulster "Scannlán, superior of Dún Lethglaisi, was killed by the Ulaid."
882 Four Masters "Eochagan, son of Aedh, son of Madagan, King of Ulidia, was slain by the sons of Ainbhith, son of Aedh."
883 Chronicon Scotorum Eochucán son of Aed, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by the sons of Ainfíth son of Aed.
883 Ulster "Eochucán son of Aed, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by the sons of Ainfíth son of Aed."
885 Four Masters "Eremhon, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, was slain by Eloir, son of Iargni, one of the Norsemen."
886 Chronicon Scotorum Eiremón son of Aed, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by Eolóir son of Iargni. Fiachna son of Ainfíth, king of Ulaid was killed by his own people.
886 Inisfallen Death of Uromun son of Aed, king of Ulaid.
886 Ulster "Éiremón son of Aed, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by Eolóir son of Iergne."
886 Ulster "Fiachna son of Ainfíth, king of Ulaid, was killed by his associates."
886 Four Masters "Fiachna, son of Ainbhith, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Ulidians themselves."
889 Four Masters "Becc, son of Erimhon, King of Ulidia, was slain by Ateidh, son of Laighne."
890 Four Masters "Muireadhach, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia, was slain by Adith, son of Loegne."
893 Chronicon Scotorum A disturbance in Ard Macha at Whitsun 27 May between the Cenél Eógain and the Ulaid, in which many fell, i.e. between Aitid son of Laigne and Flaithbertach son of Murchad, until Mael Brigte separated them. Mael Brigte thereafter received his own award and
893 Chronicon Scotorum Béc son of Eremóin, king of Ulaid, was slain by Aitéid
893 Ulster "A disturbance in Ard Macha at Whitsun between the Cenél Eógain and the Ulaid, in which many fell."
895 Chronicon Scotorum Muiredach son of Eochucán, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by Aitéid son of Laigne.
895 Ulster "Muiredach son of Eochucán, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by Aidíth son of Laigne."
896 Ulster "Mael Mochéirge son of Indrechtach, one of two kings of Ulaid, was killed by his associates"
896 Ulster "Cumuscach son of Muiredach, king of the people of Ard Cianachta, was killed by the Ulaid."
896 Four Masters A slaughter was made of the foreigners by the Ulidians.
897 Chronicon Scotorum Mael Finnia, son of Flannacán, inflicted a battle-rout at Rath Cró on the Ulaid and the Dál nAraidi, in which many fell, including Muiredach son of Mac Éitig, king of Dál nAraidi, and the son of Mael Mochéirgi son of Indrechtach i.e. Aindiarraidh, king of Leth Cathail. Aidíth son of Laigne was wounded and escaped.
897 Ulster "Mael Finnia, son of Flannacán, inflicted a battle-rout on the Ulaid and Dál nAraidi, in which many fell, including the king of Dál Araidi, i.e. Muiredach son of Mac Étigh, and Mael Mochéirge on of Indrechtach, king of Leth Cathail. Aidíth son of Laigne was wounded and escaped."
897 Four Masters "Aididh, son of Luighne, King of Ulidia, was slain by one of his own tribe, i.e. by Maelbairne."
898 Chronicon Scotorum Aidíth son of Laigne, king of Ulaid, was treacherously killed by his own people.
898 Ulster "Aidíth son of Laigne, king of Ulaid, was deceitfully killed by his associates."
908 Four Masters "A battle was gained by the foreigners over a crew or fleet of Ulidians, in the region of Saxonland i.e. in England, where many were slain with Cumascach, son of Maelmoicheirghe, Tanist of Leath-Cathail."
911 Four Masters "Maelbrighde, son of Geibhleachan, lord of Conaille, was slain by the Ui-Eathach, in the fourth month after his having taken the chieftainship."
912 Four Masters "An army was led by Niall, son of Aedh Finnliath, into Dá-Araidhe, in the month of June precisely. Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, lord of Dá-Araidhe, met them at Freghabhail where he was defeated by Niall; and he lost his brother in the conflict, i.e. Flathrua Ua Leathlobhair. Aedh, son of Eochagan, king of the province, and Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, afterwards pursued them to Carn-Ereann, where Niall again defeated them, and where Cearran, son of Colman, chief of Cinel-Mailche, and the son of Allacan, son of Lachten, were slain, and Dubhghall, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, was severely wounded; and great numbers of the Ulidians were slain in the pursuit besides these distinguished men. A peace was afterwards, on the Calends of November, made at Tealach-Og, between Niall, lord of Aileach, and Aedh, King of the province."
913 Ulster "The heathens inflicted a battle-rout on the crew of a new fleet of the Ulaid, on the coast of England, and many fell, including Cumuscach son of Mael Mocheirgi, son of the king of Leth Cathail."
914 Chronicon Scotorum The army of the North and the Ulaid was led by Niall son of Aed into Mide to Greilach Eilte. Flann son of Mael Sechnaill with his sons routed them there, and there fell there a number of them including Fergal son of Óengus son of Mael Dúin and Mael Mórda
914 Four Masters Ard-Macha was burned.
917 Four Masters "The battle of Ath-cliath (i.e. of Cill-Mosamhog, by the side of Ath-cliath) was gained over the Irish, by Imhar and Sitric Gale, on the 17th of October, in which were slain Niall Glundubh, son of Aedh Finnliath, King of Ireland, after he had been three years in the sovereignty; Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland; Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia; Maelmithidh, son of Flannagan, lord of Breagh; Maelcraeibhe Ua Duibhsinaich, lord of Oirghialla; Maelcraeibhe, son of Doilghen, lord of Tortan; Ceallach, son of Fogartach, lord of South Breagh; Cromman, son of Cinneitich; and many other noblemen and plebeians, who are not enumerated, along with the king."
919 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Áth Cliath won over the Irish by the foreigners i.e. by Ímar i.e. Sitriuc Gaile in which fell Niall Glúndub son of Aed, king of Temair, and Conchobor grandson of Mael Sechnaill heir designate of Ireland i.e. the king of Mide and Aed son of E
919 Inisfallen The battle of Áth Cliath, in which the men of Ireland were defeated by In Caech, grandson of Ímar, and there fell therein nobles of the north of Ireland, including Niall Glúndub son of Aed, king of Ireland, and Aed son of Eochucán, king of Ulaid, and Mael Mithig son of Flannacán,king of the men of Brega, and Conaing son of Flann, royal heir of Temuir, and many others.
923 Four Masters "Dubhghall, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ulidians, i.e. by the Cinel-Maelche."
924 Four Masters "A victory was gained by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and the Ulidians, at the bridge of Cluain-na-gCruimhther, on the 28th of December, being Thursday, where were slain eight hundred men with their chieftains, Albdann, son of Godfrey, Aufer, and Roilt. The other half of them were besieged for a week at Ath-Cruithne, until Godfrey, lord of the foreigners, came to their assistance from Ath-cliath."
925 Chronicon Scotorum Dubgall son of Aed, heir designate of Ulaid, was slain by Cenél Maence.
925 Inisfallen Death of Dubgall son of Aed, king of Ulaid.
925 Ulster "Dubgall son of Aed, king of Ulaid, was killed by his own people."
926 Chronicon Scotorum Slaughter was inflicted on the foreigners by the Ulaid, in which eight hundred were killed including the king i.e. Albdan son of Gothfrith and Aufer and Rolt, by Muirchertach son of Niall.
930 Four Masters "Loingseach Ua Leathlobhair, King of Ulidia, died."
931 Four Masters "A battle was gained by Conaing, son of Niall, and the foreigners of Loch Eathach, over the province of Ulidia, wherein twelve hundred were slain."
931 Four Masters "Ard-Macha was plundered about the festival of St. Martin, by the son of Godfrey, i.e. Amlaeibh, with the foreigners of Loch-Cuan about him. Matadhan, son of Aedh, with the inhabitants of the pro-vince of Ulidia, and Amhlaeibh, son of Godfrey, with the foreigners, spoiled and plundered the province of Ulster as far as Sliabh-Beatha to the west, and and as far as Mucnamha to the east; but they were overtaken by Muircheartach, son of Niall, and a battle was fought between them, in which he defeated them; and they left with him two hundred heads cut off, besides prisoners and spoils."
933 Chronicon Scotorum Matudán son of Aed with the province of Ireland and Amlaíb son of Gothfrith with the foreigners went and plundered as far as Sliabh Betha, and Muirchertach son of Niall overtook them and they left twelve hundred dead and their plunder.
933 Ulster "Conaing son of Niall inflicted a defeat on the Ulaid at Ruba Con Chongalt, in which three hundred or somewhat more fell. Matudán son of Aed, with the forces of the Province of Ireland, and foreigners, went and plundered westward as far as Sliab Betha and southward as far as Mucnám, and Muirchertach son of Niall came upon them and defeated them, and they lost twelve score and their spoils "
935 Four Masters "Eochaidh, son of Conall, King of Ulidia, died."
940 Four Masters "Dun-Leathghlaise was plundered by the son of Raghnall and his foreigners. God and Patrick quickly took vengeance of him for this deed, for foreigners came across the sea, and attacked them on their island, so that the son of Raghnall, their chief, escaped to the main land; he was killed by Madudhan, King of Ulidia, in revenge of Patrick, before the end of a week after the plundering."
942 Chronicon Scotorum Dún Lethglaise was plundered by the son of Raghnall and the son of Raghnall was killed by Matudán, king of Ulaid, with a week, for the honour of Pátraic.
942 Ulster "Dún Lethglaise was plundered by the foreigners. God and Patrick avenged it on them, causing them to go overseas and taking their island from them so that their king stole away and was killed by the Irish on land."
945 Ulster "The Leth Cathail inflicted a rout on the foreigners of Loch Cuan, in which nearly all were destroyed."
947 Four Masters "Madudhan, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia, was slain by the Ulidians themselves."
948 Four Masters "Madudhan, son of Aedh, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Ulidians themselves."
950 Chronicon Scotorum Matudán son of Aed, king of Ulaid, was slain by his own people.
950 Inisfallen Death of Matudán, king of Ulaid. Death of Ruaidrí Ua Canannáin, high-king of Cenél Conaill.
950 Ulster "Matudán son of Aed was killed by the Uí Echach, i.e. by the sons of Bran, but God avenged him within a short time by bringing about their deaths."
959 Four Masters "Niall, son of Aedh, son of Eochagan, King of Ulidia, died."
962 Chronicon Scotorum There was a raid by Flaithbertach son of Concobor, king of Ailech, into Dál nAraide, and he plundered Coindere, and the Ulaid overtook them and he was killed there with his two brothers, i.e. Tadc and Conn.
962 Ulster "Flaithbertach son of Conchobor, king of Ailech, made a raid in Dál Araidi and plundered Condaire; and the Ulaid came upon him, and he and his two kinsmen, i.e. Tadc and Conn, and many others, were killed."
967 Ulster "Aed ua hAitid, king of Uí Echach, was killed by his own people."
968 Four Masters "An army was led by the King of Ulidia, Artghal, son of Madudhan, against the foreigners; and he plundered Coindere, then in their possession, but left behind a number of heads."
969 Inisfallen Death of Ardgal son of Matudan, king of Ulaid, and of Donnocán son of Mael Maire, king of Airgialla, [inflicted] by the son of Congalachand by the foreigners of Áth Cliath.
970 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Cell Móna was won by Domnall son of Congalach with the foreigners of Áth Cliath over Domnall son of Muirchertach king of Temair, in which fell many including Ardgar son of Matudán, king of Ulaid, Donnacán son of Maelmuire, king of Airgialla,
970 Ulster "The king of Ulaid, i.e. Ardgar son of Matudán, made an expedition with the foreigners and sacked Connaire, leaving a great many beheaded there."
970 Ulster "The battle of Cell Móna was won by Domnall son of Congalach and Amlaíb against Domnall ua Néill, and there fell there Ardgar son of Matudán, king of Ulaid, and Donnacán son of Mael Muire king of Airgialla, and Cinaed son of Cróngall, king of Conaille, and very many others."
971 Chronicon Scotorum Niall son of Aed, king of Ulaid, dies.
971 Ulster "Niall son of Aed, king of Ulaid, dies "
972 Chronicon Scotorum A battle between the Ulaid and the Dál Araide in which fell Aed son of Loingsech, king of the province, and others. Eochaidh was victor.
972 Ulster "A battle between the Ulaid and the Dál Araidi in which fell the king of the Province, i.e. Aed son of Loingsech, and others."
972 Inisfallen Death of Aed son of Loingsech, king of Ulaid, by the grandson of Matudán.
974 Four Masters "Tadhg Ua Ruadhrach, lord of Cianachta, was slain in Ulidia."
976 Ulster "Tadc son of Ruaidrí, king of Cianacht, was killed in Ulaid."
976 Tigernach "Tadhg son of Ruaidhre chief of the Cianacht of Glenn Gemin, was killed in Ulster."
976 Four Masters "The battle of Cill-mona was gained by Domhnall, son of Conghalach, and Amhlaeibh, over the king, Domhnall Ua Neill, wherein fell Ardghal, son of Madadhan, King of Ulidia; Donnagan, son of Maelmuire; and Cinaedh, son of Croinghille, lord of Conaille, with a large number besides them."
978 Four Masters "A battle between the Ulidians and Dá-Araidhe, wherein the king of the province, i.e. Aedh, son of Loingseach, and many others, were slain by Eochaidh, son of Ardgar."
979 Four Masters "A great army was led by Maelseachlainn, son of Domhnall, King of Ireland, and by Eochaidh, son of Ardgar, King of Ulidia, against the foreigners of Ath-cliath; and they laid siege to them for three days and three nights, and carried thence the hostages of Ireland, and among the rest Domhnall Claen, King of Leinster, and all the hostages of the Ui-Neill. Two thousand was the number of the hostages, besides jewels and goods, and the freedom of the Ui- Neill, from the Sinainn to the sea, from tribute and exaction. It was then Maelseachlainn himself issued the famous proclamation, in which he said: ""Every one of the Gaeidhil who is in the territory of the foreigners, in servitude and bondage, let him go to his own territory in peace and happiness."" This captivity was the Babylonian captivity of Ireland, until they were released by Maelseachlainn; it was indeed next to the captivity of hell."
980 Chronicon Scotorum A great army was led by Mael Sechnaill son of Domnall, king of Temair, and by Eochaidh son of Ardgal, king of Ulaid, to the foreigners of Áth Cliath and they besieged them for three days and three nights, and brought away the hostages of Ireland including
980 Tigernach "A great hosting by Maelseachnaill the Great son of Domhnall, king of Tara, and by Eochaidh son of Ardghal, king of the Ulaid, to the Foreigners of Dublin, and they beleaguered them for three days and three nights, and brought thence the hostages of Ireland, including Domhnall Claon, king of Leinster, and the guarantees of the Ua Néill besides, and they got their full demand from the Foreigners, {folio 15a2}to wit, two thousand kine, with jewels and treasures, and moreover with the freedom of the Ua Néill from tribute, from the Shannon to the sea. Tis then that Maelseachnaill proclaimed the famous rising when he said: ˜Let every one of the Gaels who is in the Foreigner's province come forth to his own country for peace and comfort. That captivity was the Babylonian captivity of Ireland; twas next to the capitivity of Hell."
981 Ulster "Domnall ua hAitid, king of Uí Echach, and Loingsech son of Fogartach, king of Uí Nialláin, fell by one another."
981 Four Masters "Archu, son of Niall, royal heir of Ulidia, was slain by his kinsmen."
982 Chronicon Scotorum Árchú son of Niall, heir designate of Ulaid, was treacherously killed by his own people.
982 Ulster Árchú son of Niall was treacherously killed by the sons of Ardgar.
982 Tigernach "Árchu son of Niall, crown prince of Ulster, by his own brethren in a trick was killed."
984 Ulster "Flaithbertach ua hÁnluain, king of Uí Nialláin, was deceitfully killed by the Uí Bresail."
988 Four Masters "Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, went upon an expedition into Cinel-Eoghain, and lost Ua h-Aitidhe."
988 Four Masters Dun-Leathghlaissi was plundered and burned by the foreigners.
989 Ulster Dún Lethglaise was plundered by the foreigners and burned.
989 Ulster "Eochaid son of Ardgar, king of Ulaid, went on an expedition to Cenél Eógain, and left behind ua hAitid dead."
1000 Inisfallen The men of Mumu invaded Áth Cliath, set fire to it, and burned it, and they invested it on the Kalends of January; and they burned Caill Tomair as firewood; and the king of the foreigners of Áth Cliath escaped from the battle to Ulaid, but found no protection for himself in Ireland until he handed over his hostages to Brian, son of Cennétig; and Brian gave the fort to the foreigners.
1000 Four Masters Laidhgnen Ua Leog-gan was slain by the Ulidians.
1001 Four Masters "Sitric, son of Amhlaeibh, set out on a predatory excursion into Ulidia, in his ships; and he plundered Cill-cleithe and Inis-Cumhscraigh, and carried off many prisoners from both."
1001 Four Masters "A hosting by Brian, with the foreigners, Leinstermen, and Munstermen, to Ath-Luain, so that he weakened the Ui-Neill of the South and the Connaughtmen, and took their hostages. After this Brian and Maelseachlainn, accompanied by the men of Ireland, as well Meathmen, Connaughtmen, Munstermen, and Leinstermen, as the foreigners, proceeded to Dun-Dealgan, in Conaille-Muirtheimhne. Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, and Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, with the Ulidians, Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, and Airghialla, repaired to the same place to meet them, and did not permit them to advance further, so that they separated in peace, without hostages or booty, spoils or pledges."
1002 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by Brian and by Mael Sechnaill with the men of Ireland, both Connachta and Munstermen and Laigin and foreigners, as far as Dún Delga in Conaille. Aed son of Domnall ua Néill, overking of Ailech, and Eochaidh son of Ardgal king of Ulaid wit
1002 Tigernach "A hosting by Brian and by Maelseachlainn, accompanied by the men of Ireland, both Munster and Connacht and Leinster and Foreigners, as far as Dundalk in Conailli. Aodh son of Domhnall, high-king oa Ailech, and Eochaidh son of Ardgal, king of Ulster, with the Ulaid and the Kindred of Eoghan and of Conall, and the Airgáill met them and did not let them go past, so they separated under a truce, without hostage, without pledge."
1002 Inisfallen A muster of the men of Mumu, the Connachta, the men of Mide, the Laigin, and of the foreigners of Áth Cliath and Port Láirge by Brian, son of Cennétig, against the Ulaid to take their hostages.
1002 Ulster "Brian and Mael Sechnaill led an army to Dún Delca to demand hostages from Aed and Eochaid, and they parted on terms of truce."
1003 Four Masters "The battle of Craebh-tulcha, between the Ulidians and the Cinel-Eoghain, in which the Ulidians were defeated. In this battle were slain Eochaidh, son of Ardghair, King of Ulidia, and Dubhtuinne, his brother; and the two sons of Eochaidh, i.e. Cuduiligh and Domhnall; Gairbhidh, lord of Ui-Eathach; Gillapadraig, son of Tomaltach; Cumuscach, son of Flathrai; Dubhshlangha, son of Aedh; Cathal, son of Etroch; Conene, son of Muircheartach; and the most part of the Ulidians in like manner; and the battle extended as far as Dun-Eathach and Druim-bo. Donnchadh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dá-Araidhe, and royal heir of Ulidia, was slain on the following day by the Cinel-Eoghain. Aedh, son of Domhnall Ua Neill, lord of Oileach, and heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the heat of the conflict, in the fifteenth year of his reign, and the twenty-ninth of his age."
1004 Chronicon Scotorum Giolla Comgaill son of Ardgal and his two sons and two hundred with them were treacherously killed by Mael Ruanaidh son of Ardgal when contending for the kingship of Ulaid.
1004 Chronicon Scotorum The battle of Craeb Telcha between the Ulaid and the Cenél Eógain, and the Ulaid were defeated and there fell there Eochaidh son of Artgal, king of Ulaid, and Dub Tuinne his brother and Eochaidh's two sons i.e. Cú Duiligh and Domnall, and Garbíth, king of Uí Echach, and Gilla Pátraic son of Tomaltach and Cumascach son of Flaithrí and Dubh Slánga son of Aed, and Cathalán son of Etroch and Conéne son of Muirchertach, and the rest of the Ulaid also and their rout went as far as Dún Echach and Druim Bó. Aed son of Domnall ua Néill, king of Ailech and heir designate of Ireland, fell in the counterattack of the battle. Donnchad ua Loinsigh, king of Dál Araide and heir designate of Ulaid, was killed on the next day by the Cenél Eogain.
1004 Inisfallen A battle at Craeb Tulcha between the Ulaid and Cenél Eógain and Cenél Conaill, and Aed son of Domnall Ua Néill, king of Ailech, was slain therein; and Eochaid son of Ardgal, king of Ulaid, together with his princes fell in the same battle.
1004 Ulster "The battle of Craeb Tulcha between the Ulaid and the Cenél Eógain, i.e. on Thursday the 18th of the Kalends, of October 14th Sept., and the Ulaid were defeated; and therein fell Eochaid son of Ardgar, king of Ulaid, and his kinsman Dub Tuinne, and his two sons, Cú Duilig and Domnall; and there was also a slaughter of the army, both noble and base Gairbíth king of Uí Echach, and Gilla Pátraic son of Tomaltach, and Cumuscach son of Flathroí, and Dub Slánga son of Aed, and Cathalán son of Étrú, and Coinéne son of Muirchertach, as well as the elite of the Ulaid; and the combat ranged as far as Dún Echdach and Druim Bó. Thus in the Book of Dub dá Leithe. Moreover, Aed son of Domnall ua Néill, king of Ailech, fell there in the 29th year of his age and in the tenth of his reign, and others also; but the Cenél Eógain claim that he was killed by themselves."
1004 Four Masters "Gillacomhghaill, son of Ardghar, and his son, and two hundred along with them, were slain by Maelruanaidh, son of Ardghar, contending for the kingdom of Ulidia."
1004 Four Masters "A hosting by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, with the men of the south of Ireland, into Cinel-Eoghain and Ulidia, to demand hostages. They proceeded through Meath, where they remained a night at Tailltin. They afterwards marched northwards, and remained a week at Ard-Macha; and Brian left twenty ounces of gold as an offering upon the altar of Ard-Macha. After that they went into Dá-Araidhe, and carried off the pledges of the Dá-Araidhe and Dá-Fiatach in general."
1004 Four Masters "A battle was gained at Loch-Bricrenn, by Flaithbheartach, over the Ui-Eathach and the Ulidians,where Artan, royal heir of Ui-Eathach, was slain."
1005 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by Brian with the men of Ireland to Cenél Eogain and to Ulaid to seek hostages, through Mide, so that they were one night in Tailtiu, thence to Ard Macha, and they were a week there and Brian left twenty unga of gold on the altar of Ard Macha. They went thence to Dál Araide and brought away the aitire of Dál Araide and the aitire of the Ulaid.
1005 Inisfallen The Ulaid abandoned their land on account of scarcity and scattered throughout Ireland.
1005 Ulster "Gilla Comgaill, king of Ulaid, was killed by Mael Ruanaid, his own brother."
1005 Inisfallen A muster by Brian, son of Cennétig, of the men of Ireland, both foreigners and Gaedil south of Sliab Fuait, to Ard Machaand to Ráith Mór of Mag Line in Ulaid to obtain the hostages of Cenél Conaill and Cenél Eógain.
1005 Ulster "Aed son of Tomaltach, i.e. king of Leth Cathail, was killed by Flaithbertach ua Néill in an invasion of Leth Cathail."
1005 Ulster "A rout of the Ulaid and of the Uí Echach at Loch Bricrenn, in which Artán, heir designate of Uí Echach, fell "
1005 Four Masters "Echmhilidh Ua hAitidhe, lord of Ui-Eathach, was slain by the Ulidians themselves."
1005 Four Masters "A great army was led by Brian, son of Ceinneidigh, into Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, to demand hostages. The route they took was through the middle of Connaught, over Eas-Ruaidh, through the middle of Tir-Conaill, through Cinel-Eoghain, over Feartas Camsa, into Dá-Riada, into Dá-Araidhe, into Ulidia, into Conaille-Muirtheimhne; and they arrived, about Lammas, at Bealach-duin. The Leinstermen then proceeded southwards across Breagha to their territory, and the foreigners by sea round eastwards southwards? to their fortress. The Munstermen also and the Osraighi went through Meath westwards to their countries. The Ulidians rendered hostages on this occasion; but they Brian Borumha and his party did not obtain the hostages of the races of Conall and Eoghan."
1005 Four Masters "Maelruanaidh, son of Ardghar, King of Ulidia, was slain by Madadhan, son of Domhnall, after being one-half year in the government of the province. Madadhan, son of Domhnall, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Torc, i.e. Dubhtuinne, in the middle of Dun-Leathghlaise, in violation of the guarantees of the saints of Ireland. Dubhtuinne, i.e. the Torc, King of Ulidia, was slain, through the miracles of God and Patrick, by Muireadhach, son of Madadhan, in revenge of his father."
1006 Chronicon Scotorum A great army of the men of Ireland was led by Brian son of Cendétigh, king of Mumu, to Cenél Conaill and Cené Eógain to obtain hostages, through the centre of Connacht, over Es Ruadh through the centre of Cenél Conaill, and through Cenél Eogain to Belach
1006 Inisfallen Brian, together with the men of Mumu, the Laigin, the men of Mide, Mael Sechnaill, the Connachta, the foreigners of Áth Cliath, and the men of the whole of Ireland south of Sliab Fuait [came] to Áth Luain, went to Es Ruaid, proceeded across it northwards, and made a circuit of the north of Ireland including Cenél Conaill, Cenél Eógain, Ulaid, and Airgialla.
1006 Ulster "Eichmílid ua hAitid, king of Uí Echach by the Ulaid, Mael Ruanaid son of Flannacán by the Conaille, and Cathalán, king of Gailenga, were killed."
1006 Ulster "Brian brought an army on a circuit of Ireland into Connacht, over Es Ruaid into Tír Conaill, through Cenél Eógain, over Fertas Camsa, into Ulaid, into the assembly of the Conaille; and at Lammas they came to Belach Dúin, and the full demand of the community of Patrick and of his successor i.e. Mael Muire son of Eochaid, was granted. 1. (It is remarkable that Sliab Cua has no troop,"
1006 Ulster "Gilla Comgaill son of Ardgar son of Matudán, i.e. king of Ulaid, was killed by his brother i.e. by Mael Ruanaid son of Ardgar."
1006 Four Masters "An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill into Ulidia, and carried off seven hostages from them, and slew the lord of Leath-Chathail, i.e. Cuuladh, son of Aenghus."
1006 Four Masters "Domhnall, son of Dubhtuinne, King of Ulidia, was slain by Muireadhach, son of Madudhan, and Uarghaeth of Sliabh Fuaid."
1007 Chronicon Scotorum Domnall son of Dub Tuinne, king of Ulaid, was killed by Muiredach son of Matudán and by Uargaeth of Sliab Fuait.
1007 Chronicon Scotorum Mael Ruanaidh son of Ardgal king of Ulaid was killed by Matudán son of Domnall. Matudán son of Domnall, however, was killed by the Torc in the centre of Dui despite the protection of the saints of Ireland.
1007 Chronicon Scotorum The Torc, king of Ulaid, was killed by the power of God and Pátraic.
1007 Ulster Mael Ruanaid son of Ardgar was killed by Matudán son of Domnall.
1007 Inisfallen Death of Mael Ruanaid, king of Ulaid.
1007 Inisfallen A great muster of the men of Ireland, both foreigners and Gaedil, by Brian to Ard Macha, and they took the hostages of Ulaid from the king of Ailech by force.
1007 Ulster "Matudán son of Domnall, king of Ulaid, was killed by the 'Torc' in Brigit's church in the middle of Dún dá Lethglas."
1007 Inisfallen Death of Matudán, king of Ulaid
1007 Ulster "Flaithbertach ua Néill led an expedition into Ulaid, took seven pledges from the Ulaid, and killed the king of Leth Cathail, i.e. Cú Ulad son of Aengus."
1007 Ulster "Brian led an expedition to Cenél Eógain, i.e. to Dún Droma, beside Ard Macha, and took away ua Críchidéin, successor of Finnén of Mag Bile, who was a pledge in Cenél Eógain on behalf of the Ulaid."
1007 Ulster "The 'Torc,' king of Ulaid, was killed through the power of God and Patrick by Muiredach son of Matudán, in revenge for his father."
1007 Four Masters "Muireadhach, son of Dubhtuinne, King of Ulidia, was slain."
1007 Ulster "Domnall son of Dub Tuinne, king of Ulaid, was killed by Muiredach son of Matudán and by Uarghaeth of Sliab Fuait."
1008 Ulster "Muiredach son of Matudán, heir designate of Ulaid, was killed by his own people."
1010 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by Brian to the Claenloch of Sliab Fuair, and he took the aitire of Cenél Eógain and the Ulaid.
1010 Ulster "(Scannlán ua Dungaláin, superior of Dún Lethglaisi, was outraged in Dún Lethglaisi, abducted and blinded in Finnubair, by Niall son of Dub Tuinne."
1010 Four Masters "An army was led by Flaithbheartach Ua Neill to Dun-Eathach; and he burned the fortress, and demolished the town, and he carried off pledges from Niall, son of Dubhthuinne."
1011 Ulster "Flaithbertach ua Néill led an army to Dún Echdach, burned the fort and demolished its town, and took a pledge from Niall son of Dub Tuinne"
1011 Four Masters "An army was afterwards led by Flaithbheartach, till he arrived at Ard-Uladh, so that the whole of the Ardes was plundered by him; and he bore off from thence spoils the most numerous that a king had ever borne, both prisoners and cattle without number."
1011 Four Masters "A battle was gained over Niall, son of Dubhtuinne, i.e. the battle of the Mullachs, by Niall, son of Eochaidh, son of Ardghar, where many were slain, together with Muircheartach, son of Artan, Tanist of Ui-Eathach; and he afterwards deposed Niall, son of Dubhthuinne."
1012 Ulster "A defeat i.e. the battle of Na Mullaig was inflicted on Niall son of Dub Tuinne, by Niall son of Eochaid, in which fell Muirchertach son of Artán, heir designate of Uí Echach, and Eochaid's son was afterwards made king."
1014 Loch Ce Brian, however, assembled neither host nor multitude against this great army of the west of the world, and of Foreigners, but the men of Mumha alone, and Maelshechlainn with the men of Midhe; for there came not to him the Ulidians, nor the Airghialla; nor the Cenel-Eoghain, nor the Cenel-Conaill; nor the men of Connacht, save the Hi-Maine, and Hi-Fiachrach, and Cenel-Oedha; for goodwill existed not then between Brian and Tadhg-an-eichghil, son of Cathal, son of Conchobhar, king of Connacht; and hence it was that Tadhg refused to go with Brian to that battle of Cluain-tarbh.
1014 Ulster A defeat was inflicted on the Dál Araide by the Ulaid in which many were killed.
1015 Chronicon Scotorum A great raid by the Ulaid and they plundered Ard Macha from the ráith outwards and took great spoils from it.
1015 Four Masters "An army was led by Maelseachlainn into Ulidia, and carried off the hostages of the Ulidians."
1015 Four Masters "Dun-da-leathghlas was totally burned, with its Daimhliag and Cloictheach, by lightning."
1015 Four Masters "A battle between the Ulidians and the Dá-Araidhe, wherein the DaI-Araidhe were defeated by Niall, son of Eochaidh; and wherein fell Domhnall, son of Loingseach, lord of Dá-Araidhe; Niall, son of Dubhtuine, son of Eochaidh, son of Ardgar, ex-king of Ulidia; and Conchobhar Ua Domhnallain,lord of Ui-Tuirtri, and others along with them."
1016 Chronicon Scotorum A battle between the Dál Araide and the Ulaid. The Dál Araide were defeated and there fell there Domnall ua Loingsigh king of Dál Araide and Niall son of Dubtuinne son of Ardgal, overking of Ulaid, and Conchobor ua Domnaill king of Uí Tuirtre and others.
1016 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by Mael Sechnaill into Ulaid and he took the hostages of Ulaid.
1016 Loch Ce A battle between the Ulidians and the Dá-Araidhe, and the Dá-Araidhe were defeated; in which fell Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, king of Dá-Araidhe, and Niall, son of Dubhthuinne, and Conchobhar Ua Domhnallain, king of Uí-Tuirtre.
1016 Loch Ce Niall, son of Eochaidh, and Coscrach, son of Muiredhach, son of Flann, king of Feara-Maighe-Itha, a suis occisi sunt. (were killed by his own)
1016 Ulster "A battle between the Ulaid and the Dál Araide, and the Dál Araide were defeated. There fell therein Domnall ua Loingsigh, king of Dál Araide, and Niall son of Dub Tuinne, and Conchobur ua Domnalláin, king of Uí Thuirtri, and many others. Niall son of Eochaid was triumphant."
1019 Four Masters "Flaithbheartach Ua hEochaidh was blinded by Niall, son of Eochaidh."
1020 Ulster Flaithbertach ua hEochada was blinded by Niall son of Eochaid.
1020 Tigernach Flaithbheartach Ua hEochadha was blinded by Niall son of Eochaid.
1022 Loch Ce A naval battle on the sea, between the foreigners of Ath-cliath and Niall, son of Eochaidh, king of Uladh; and the foreigners were defeated, and slaughtered; and some of them were enslaved, moreover.
1022 Ulster "A naval combat in the open sea between the foreigners of Áth Cliath and Niall son of Eochaid, king of Ulaid, and the foreigners were defeated and a great number of them slaughtered, and prisoners were also taken."
1022 Tigernach "A seafight on the sea between the Foreigners of Dublin and Niall son of Eochaidh, king of Ulster. The Foreigners were defeated and they themselves were brought into captivity, and along with them their galleys, save what got away by force. Flaithrí son of Dub Slanga, son of Aodh son of Tomaltach, king of Lecale, fell by the Foreigners in that sea-fight, in the seventeenth year of his age."
1022 Ulster "A defeat was inflicted in Sliab Fuait on the Airgialla by Niall son of Eochaid, and there was a great slaughter of the Airgialla there."
1022 Four Masters "A battle on the sea between the foreigners of Ath-cliath and Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, wherein the foreigners were defeated, and they themselves led into captivity, and their ships carried away, except a few which fled away. Flathroi, son of Dubhslangha, son of Aedh, son of Tomaltach, fell by the foreigners in that sea battle, in the seventeenth year of his age."
1022 Four Masters "A victory was gained at Sliabh-Fuaid over the Airghialla, by Niall, son of Eochaidh; and a great slaughter was made of the Airghialla there."
1024 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by the son of Eochaidh to the foreigners and he burned them and took the hostages of the Irish from them.
1024 Tigernach "A hosting by the son of Eochaidh to the Foreigners and he brought away from them the hostages of the Gaels, together with other great spoil."
1026 Ulster At the same time Eochaid's son led an expedition against the foreigners and burned their territory and took great booty and valuables from them.
1027 Loch Ce A predatory expedition by the Cenel-Eoghain into Ulidia, and they brought with them a great prey of cows.
1027 Ulster Cenél Eógain made a raid on the Ulaid and took away a great tribute of cows.
1027 Four Masters A depredation was committed by the Cinel-Eoghain upon the Ulidians; and they carried off a great prey of cattle.
1031 Ulster Eochaid's son led an expedition to Telach Ócc and achieved nothing. Aed ua Néill passed round him eastwards and took away three thousand cows and twelve hundred captives.
1031 Ulster "Eochaid's son led an expedition into Uí Echach, burned Cell Chomair and its oratory, killed four clerics, and took thirty captives."
1031 Four Masters "An army was led by the son of Eochaidh to Tealach Og, but he seized nothing. Aedh Ua Neill passed him by eastwards, and carried off three thousand cows, and one thousand two hundred captives."
1031 Tigernach A hosting by Mac Eochadha to Telach óc and he obtained nothing. Aodh Ua Néilll got round him eastwards and carried off a thousand cows and twelve hundred human beings.
1032 Loch Ce The victory of Druim-Bennchair was gained over the Ulidians, by the Airghialla.
1032 Ulster The defeat of Druim Bennchuir was inflicted on the Ulaid by the Airgialla.
1034 Ulster "An expedition by the Ulaid to Mide, to Tech Meic Melléin."
1040 Four Masters "Cill-dara, Ceanannus, Dun-da-leathghlas, and many other churches, were burned."
1044 Tigernach "A hosting by the son of Eochaidh into Bregia, where he left two hundred of his people."
1045 Tigernach "A slaughter in Rathlin of the Ulaid including Raghnall Ua hEochadha, by Imar son of Harald."
1045 Inisfallen Ragnall Ua hEochada, royal heir of Ulaid, was slain by the foreigners of Áth Cliath in Rechru, together with three hundred nobles around him.
1045 Tigernach "A hosting by Mac Eochadha and Maolseachlainn as far as the Foreigners, and they burned Swords and Fingal."
1045 Four Masters "A slaughter was made of the Ulidians at Reachrainn, by the foreigners of Ath-cliath, i.e. Imhar, son of Aralt, in which were slain three hundred men, together with Raghnall Ua h-Eochadha."
1046 Ulster "Muiredach son of Flaithbertach ua Néill, heir designate of Ailech, and Aiteid ua hAiteid, king of Uí Echach Ulad, were burned in a house set on fire by Cú Ulad son of Congalach, king of Uachtar Tíre."
1046 Four Masters "Conchobhar Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dá-Araidhe, was slain by the son of Domhnall Ua Loingsigh, in Leinster (i.e. in Ui-Buidhe), in violation of the guarantee of Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, and of Diarmaid, son of Mael-na-mbo."
1047 Chronicon Scotorum Great famine came in Ulaid so that they left their territory and went into Laigin and it is from violating protection that famine came i.e. treachery was played on the two sons of Bran son of Mael Mórdha by the son of Eochaidh and the nobles of Ulaid when they were sureties for them, and it is on the son of Mael na mbó the Ulaid played that treachery.
1047 Chronicon Scotorum Great snow in this year the like of which was not previously experienced.
1047 Tigernach Ulster was almost wholly devastated and its people went into Leinster.
1047 Four Masters "A great famine came upon the Ulidians, so that they left their territory, and proceeded into Leinster. It was on account of the violation of a covenant this famine came on, namely, a treachery was committed on the two sons of Maelmordha, i.e. Murchadh and Ceallach, by the son of Eochaidh and the chiefs of Ulidia, after they had been placed under their protection; and it was to annoy the son of Mael-na-mbo that the Ulidians committed this act of treachery."
1048 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by the son of Eochaidh and by the son of Mael na mbó into Mide, and they burned almost all the churches of the men of Mide.
1048 Tigernach "A hosting by the son of Eochaidh and by the son of Maol na mBó to Meath, where they burned almost all the churches of the men of Meath."
1048 Four Masters "An army was led by the son of Eochaidh and the son of Mael-na-mbo into Meath, and they burned the churches of Meath, except a few."
1049 Tigernach "A hosting by the Ulaid and the Leinstermen into Meath to demand the hostages of the men of Bregia, and then these hostages, together with Toirdhealbhach Ua Cathasaigh, were killed by Conchobhar and the armies afterwards burned the country, both churches and fortresses."
1049 Four Masters "An army was led by the Ulidians, Leinstermen, and foreigners, into Meath, to demand the hostages of the men of Breagha. Their hostages were put to death by Conchobhar Ua Maeleachlainn, together with Toirdhealbhach Ua Cathasaigh; after which the forces burned the country, both churches and fortresses."
1052 Ulster "The king of Ulaid in 1052 was Niall son of Eochaid, who came in that year to Osraige."
1056 Ulster "Étrú son of Labraid, chief of the Monaig, a pillar of the glory of Ulaid, died in penitence "
1062 Chronicon Scotorum The son of Eochaidh, king of Ulaid, died.
1062 Tigernach "Eochaidh son of Niall son of Eochaidh, king of Ulster, died."
1062 Ulster "Eochaid son of Niall son of Eochaid, heir designate of Uladh, and Eochaid ua Laithéin, king of Síl Duibtire, died in penitence."
1062 Four Masters "Niall, son of Eochaidh, King of Ulidia, and his son, Eochaidh, son of Neill, son of Eochaidh, royal heir of the province, died on Thursday, the Ides of September."
1063 Inisfallen Niall son of Eochaid, king of Ulaid, dies this year.
1063 Tigernach Mac Eochada king of Ulster died.
1063 Loch Ce Niall, son of Eochaidh, chief king of Uladh, died on the ides of November, on a Thursday, and on the 18th of the moon.
1063 Ulster "Niall son of Eochaid, over-king of Ulaid, died on Thursday the Ides 13th of November, the eighteenth of the moon."
1063 Four Masters "Eochaidh Ua hEochadha, King of Uladh, died."
1064 Ulster "Diarmait ua Lorcáin, heir designate of Laigin, was killed by the Cenél Eógain in Ulaid."
1065 Chronicon Scotorum Ua Matgamna, king of Ulaid, was treacherously killed.
1065 Loch Ce Donnchadh Ua Mathghamhna, king of Uladh, was slain at Bennchair a suis
1065 Ulster "Donnchad ua Mathgamna, king of Ulaid, was killed in Bennchor by his own people"
1065 Inisfallen Ua Mathgamna, king of Ulaid, was slain.
1065 Tigernach "Donnchadh Ua Mathghamhna, king of Ulster, was killed per dolum."
1065 Four Masters "Donnchadh Ua Mathghamhna, King of Ulidia, was killed by the Ulidians themselves, in the Daimhliag stone church of Beannchair."
1065 Four Masters "Brodar, the enemy of Comhghall (it was by him the king was killed at Beannchair), was slain by the lord of Dá-Araidhe."
1065 Ulster "Echmíled ua hAitid, king of Uí Echach, was killed by the Cenél Eógain."
1069 Four Masters "Dun-da-leathghlas, Ard-sratha, Lusca, and Sord-Choluim-Chille, were burned."
1070 Loch Ce Ua Flaithri, king of Uladh, was dethroned by Ua Maelruanaidh and the Ulidians; but this Ua Maelruanaidh was slain in battle immediately after, by Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha.
1071 Chronicon Scotorum Ua Maílruanaidh, king of Ulaid, was killed.
1071 Ulster "The king of Ulaid, i.e. Ua Flaithri, was deposed by ua Maelruanaid and by the Ulaid, but that ua Maelruanaid was killed forthwith in battle by Donnsléibe ua Eochada."
1071 Tigernach "Ua Maolruanaidh, king of Ulster, was killed."
1071 Four Masters "The King of Ulidia, i.e. Cu-Uladh Ua Flaithri, was deposed, and expelled into Leinster, by Ua Maelruanaidh and the Ulidians; and this Ua Maelruanaidh was slain in battle immediately after, by Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha."
1072 Chronicon Scotorum Ua Flaithrí king of Ulaid and the son of Aisith, king of Gabla, were burned in a house set on fire by the men of Mide.
1072 Tigernach "Ua Flaithrí, king of Ulster, and his son Aisidh, king of the Ua­ Gabla, were burned in a house set on fire and a multitude besides."
1072 Four Masters "Cuuladh Ua Flathrai, King of Ulidia, and Mac Asidha, i.e. Gabhadhan, lord of Ui-Gabhla, were burned by the men of Meath, in an ignited house, and a great number of other persons along with them."
1074 Four Masters "Aedh Meranach, King of Ulidia, was drowned at Luimneach, or in Loch-Eathach."
1075 Tigernach "A hosting by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain to Ardee, accompanied by the choice of the men of Ireland, to demand hostages from the Airgialla and the Ulaid. But he returned without hostages or pledges, after some of his people had been killed."
1075 Four Masters "A hosting of the Meathmen, Connaughtmen, the foreigners, the Leinstermen, the Osraighi, and the Munstermen, was made by Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain; and they marched to Ath-Fhirdia, to demand hostages from the Oirghialla and the Ulidians. The chiefs of the province came to oppose them, and when they were face to face, a battle was fought at Ard-Monann between the Airghialla and Muircheartach Ua Briain, i.e. the royal heir of Munster, where Muircheartach and his forces were defeated, and a bloody slaughter made of his people; and his chiefs returned to their houses without hostage or pledge on that occasion."
1078 Inisfallen Donn Sléibe Ua hEochada was deposed, and he came to the house of Tairdelbach Ua Briain. In Meránach Ua hEochada took the kingship after him.
1080 Inisfallen Donn Sléibe Ua hEochada took the kingship of Ulaid
1080 Four Masters "Donnsleibhe Ua h-Eochadha went into Munster, with the chiefs of Ulidia along with him, to serve for wages."
1080 Ulster Donnsléibe ua hEochada went into Mumu with the nobles of the Ulaid to seek hire
1081 Loch Ce Ua Mathghamhna, king of Uladh, was slain by Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, in Dun-da-lethghlas.
1081 Inisfallen Gall na Gorta Ua Mathgamna was slain by Donn Sléibe Ua hEochada in Dún dá Lethglas.
1081 Ulster "Ua Mathgamna, king of Ulaidh, was killed by Donnsléibe ua hEochada at Dún dá Lethglas."
1081 Inisfallen The king of Ulaid submitted to Tairdelbach Ua Brian, i.e. he received a stipend from him
1083 Chronicon Scotorum An Méránach ua Eochada, king of Ulaid, was drowned in Luimnech.
1083 Tigernach "The Meranach, grandson of Eochaidh, king of Ulster, was drowned at Limerick."
1084 Loch Ce A hosting by Donnsleibhe, king of Uladh, as far as Droichet-atha; and he gave pay to the son of the Caillech Ua Ruairc.
1084 Loch Ce A predatory expedition by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, in his Donnsleibhe's absence, into Ulidia, and he carried off a great spoil of cattle.
1084 Ulster "An army was brought by Donnsléibe, king of Ulaid, to Drochat Átha, and he gave stipend to the son of in Cailech ua Ruairc. A raid was made by Domnall ua Lochlainn in his rear in Ulaid, and they carried off a great prey of cattle."
1084 Four Masters "An army was led by Donnsleibhe, King of Ulidia, to Droicheatata, and gave wages to Donnchadh, the son of the Caileach Ua Ruairc. A predatory excursion was made in his Donnsleibhe's absence into Ulidia, by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, whence he carried off prisoners and a great spoil of cattle."
1086 Four Masters "The battle of Eochaill was gained by the Ulidians over the Airghialla and Ua Ruadhagain, where Cumasgach Ua Laithen, lord of Sil-Duibhthire, and Gillamoninne Ua hEochadha, lord of Clann-Sinaigh, and many others along with them, were slain."
1086 Ulster "The defeat of Eochaille was inflicted by the Ulaid on the Airgialla and on ua Ruadacán, in which fell Cumuscach ua Laithéin, king of Síl Duibtire, and Gilla Moninne ua Eochada, chief of Clann Sínaigh, and many others."
1087 Ulster "A sea expedition by the grandsons of Ragnall and by the son of the king of Ulaid into Man, and in it fell the grandsons of Ragnall."
1089 Ulster "The joint lords of the men of Fernmagh, and a multitude besides, were killed by the Uí Echach and the Ulaid in Sliab Fuaid "
1091 Chronicon Scotorum Donnslébhe ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was killed by the Cenél Eogain.
1091 Loch Ce Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha was slain by the son of Mac Lachlainn, i.e. the king of Oilech, at Bél-ghuirt-an-iobhair, in battle.
1091 Inisfallen A battle between the Ulaid and the Cenél Eógain, and Donn Sleibe Ua hEochada, king of Ulaid, was slain therein, and Donnchadh Ua hEochada was afterwards made king.
1091 Ulster "Donn Sléibe ua Eochada, king of Ulaid, was killed in battle by Lochlann's grandson, king of Ailech, at Belach Goirt in Ibair."
1091 Tigernach "Donnsliabhee grandson of Eochaidh, or maybe Dnnchadh son of Donnsliabhe, king of Ulster, was killed by the kindred of Eoghan, along with the greater part of the kindred of Eoghan slain by him.king of Ulaid"
1092 Inisfallen Ruaidrí Ua Conchobuir, king of Connachta, was treacherously blinded by Ua Flaithbertaig, and Muirchertach Ua Briain took the high-kingship of Connachta, and Diarmait Ua Briain was banished to Ulaid.
1093 Inisfallen A conference between the king of Ailech, i.e. the grandson of Lochlainn Ua Maíl Shechnaill, and Ua hEochada, king of Ulaid, at Dornann Dabaill on the edge of Loch nEchach, and by reason of a common hostility they made a covenant, with many relics including the Staff of Jesus as pledges, against Ua Briain and Leth Moga.
1094 Four Masters "Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, was slain by the King of Aileach, i.e. Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, in the battle of Bealach-Guirt-an-iubhair."
1094 Loch Ce Flaithbhertach Ua hAitheidh, king of Uí-Echach, was blinded by Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, king of Uladh.
1094 Ulster "Flaithbertach ua hAiteidh, king of Uí Echach, was blinded by Donnchad ua hEochada, king of Ulaid."
1094 Four Masters "The men of Ireland collected to Dublin, namely, Muircheartach Ua Briain, with Munstermen, the Osraighi, and the Leinstermen; Domhnall, the son of Mac Lochlainn, King of Oileach, with the Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain; Domhnall, son of Flann, King of Teamhair, with the men of Meath; Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, with the Ulidians; and Godfrey, lord of the foreigners and of Ath-cliath, with ninety ships. These proceeded from the East to Magh-Laighean, and they burned Uachtar-ard, and routed the men of Munster, Leinster, and Osraighe, who fled, without spilling blood. After this the Ulstermen returned home, for they did not wish to plunder Leinster. The men of Munster after this went eastwards again, and expelled Godfrey from Ath-cliath, and deposed the King of Teamhair, i.e. Domhnall Ua Maelseachlainn, and banished him into Oirghialla, the men of Meath having turned against him. After this Ua Maelseachlainn set out with a small party from the North, and seized the cows of Luighne and of all East Meath; but the people of Luighne and East Meath, and the soldiers of the King of Munster, overtook him at Loch Lebhinn, and got between the cows and the troop; and he was unfairly overwhelmed in battle by his own people, i.e. the son of Mac Aighennain and his troop; and their own king was slain by them, i.e. Domhnall, son of Flann, and also Gilla-Enain, son of Lughaidh, on the hill over Fobhar-Feichin."
1094 Four Masters "Flaithbheartach Ua hAidith, lord of Ui-Eathach-Uladh, was blinded by Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia."
1094 Ulster "A slaughter of the Airthir, of their nobles, i.e. including ua Fedacán and Donn son of Óengus, was carried out by the Ulaid."
1094 Four Masters "A slaughter was made of the Airtheara Oriors by the Ulidians, where a great number of the nobility fell, together with Ua Fedacain and Mac Aenghusa."
1095 Loch Ce The victory of Ard-achadh was gained by the Dá-Araidhe over the Ulidians, in which Gillacomghaill O'Cairill was slain.
1095 Inisfallen Donnchadh Ua hEochada, king of Ulaid, was deposed and banished to Cenél Eógain, and Goll Garbraige took the kingship of Ulaid.
1095 Tigernach "Domhnall Ua Fearghail, king of the Forths of Leinster, Donnchadh, king of Ulster, and the son ofDonnsliabhe, king of Ulster, were deposed."
1095 Inisfallen Foray [was made] by the Cenél Eógain and by Donnchadh Ua hEochada into Ulaid. The Ulaid overtook and defeated them, inflicting a slaughter upon them.
1095 Ulster "The defeat of Ard Achaidh was inflicted by the Dál Araide on the Ulaid, and in it fell Gilla Comgaill ua Cairill."
1095 Four Masters "A great victory was gained at Ard-achad, by the Dá-Araidhe, over the Ulidians, wherein were slain Lochlainn Ua Cairill, royal heir of Ulidia; and Gillachomhghaill Ua Cairill; and a great host along with them."
1096 Loch Ce Cu-uladh] Ua Celechain, royal heir of Oirghiall, was slain by the Ulidians
1096 Ulster "Cú Ulad ua Ceilecán, i.e. heir designate of Airgialla, was killed by the province of Ireland, i.e. by the Ulaid."
1098 Ulster "Three of the ships of the foreigners of the Isles were plundered by the Ulaid and their crews were killed, i.e. a hundred and twenty or a little more."
1098 Four Masters "Three of the ships of the foreigners were captured, and their crews slain, by the Ulidians; one hundred and twenty was their number."
1099 Loch Ce A hosting by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn and the men of the North of Erinn, into Ulidia. The Ulidians, however, were before them at Craebh-thelcha, in a camp. Their two cavalry hosts engage. The cavalry host of Ulidia is defeated, and Ua hAmhrain is slain there. The Ulidians afterwards abandon the camp, and the Cenel-Eoghain burn it, and cut down Craebh-thelcha. Two hostages are subsequently given to them, and the comarb of Comhghall as security for two other hostages.
1099 Four Masters "An army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn and the Clanna-Neill of the North across Tuaim, into Ulidia. The Ulidians were encamped before them at Craebh-Tulcha. On coming together, the hosts press the battle on each other. Both the cavalries engage. The Ulidian cavalry was routed, and Ua hAmhrain slain in the conflict. After this the Ulidians left the camp, and the Clanna-Neill burned it, and cut down the tree called Craebh-Tulcha. After this two hostages were given up to them, and the successor of Comhghall as security for two hostages more."
1099 Ulster "An expedition was made by Domnall ua Lochlainn and the North of Ireland over Tuaim into Ulaid; the Ulaid, however, were in camp at Craeb Telcha. Their two forces of horsemen meet, the force of the Ulaid is defeated, and ua hAmráin is killed there. The Ulaid then leave their camp and Cenél Eógain burn it and cut down Craeb Telcha. Two hostages are given to them thereafter, and the successor of Comgall as surety for two other hostages. "
1100 Chronicon Scotorum Donnchad ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was imprisoned by Domnall grandson of Lochlainn, king of Cenél Eogain.
1100 Loch Ce Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, king of Uladh, and a number of the chieftains of Uladh along with him, were taken prisoners by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, king of Oilech, on the fifth of the kalends of June.
1100 Tigernach "Donnchadh grandson of Eochaidh, king of Ulster, was guilefully captured by the son of Mac Lochlainn, king of the Kindred of Eoghan."
1100 Ulster "Donnchad son of Eochaid, king of Ulaid, and a number of the nobles of the Ulaid with him, was captured by Domnall ua Lochlainn, king of Ailech, on the fifth of the Kalends of June 28 May."
1100 Inisfallen Domnall son of Mac Lochlainn, king of Ailech, imprisoned Donnchadh Ua hEochada, high-king of Ulaid, and the hostages which he (Donnchadh) had taken, were afterwards brought from Ulaid.
1100 Four Masters "Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and some of the chieftains of Ulidia along with him, were taken prisoners by Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, King of Oileach, on the fifth of the Calends of June."
1100 Four Masters "Aissidh Ua hAmhradhain, lord of Dál Fiatach, died."
1101 Inisfallen The men of Mide and the Gailenga went on a foray against the men of Fernmag, and the men of Fernmag inflicted a great slaughter upon them. And Donnchadh Ua hEochada was released by Ua Lochlainn, and together they devastated Ulaid.
1101 Loch Ce Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, king of Uladh, was released from bondage by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, king of Oilech in exchange for his son and his foster-brother, viz.: in the stone-church of Ard-Macha he was released, through the intercession of the comarb of Patrick, and the congregation of Patrick likewise after mutually swearing by the Bachall-Isa, and by other principal relics on the 11th of the kalends of January.
1101 Ulster "An expedition was made by Muirchertach ua Briain and by Leth Moga into Connacht, and over Eas Ruaidh into Tír Eógain, and they razed Ailech and burned and outraged many churches also, including Fathain of Muru and Ard Sratha. They went thereafter over Fertas Camsa and burned Cúl Rathain and committed slaughter there. They afterwards took the hostages of the Ulaid. They went home over Slige Midluachra."
1101 Four Masters "A great army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, King of Munster, with the men of Munster, Leinster, Osraighe, Meath, and Connaught, across Eas-Ruaidh, into Inis-Eoghain; and he plundered Inis-Eoghain, and burned many churches and many forts about Fathan-Mura, and about Ard-sratha; and he demolished Grianan-Oiligh, in revenge of Ceann-coradh, which had been razed and demolished by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn some time before; and Muircheartach commanded his army to carry with them, from Oileach to Luimneach, a stone of the demolished building for every sack of provisions which they had. Muircheartach after this went over Feartas-Camsa into Ulidia, and carried off the hostages of Ulidia; and he went the round of all Ireland in the space of a fortnight and a month, without battle, without attack, and he returned to his house by Slighe-Midhluachra. The expedition was called ""The circuitous hosting."""
1101 Ulster "Donnchad ua Eochada, king of Ulaid, was released from bonds by Domnall grandson of Lochlainn, king of Ailech, for the sake of his son and his co-fosterling, i.e. in the stone church of Ard Macha, through the intercession of the successor of Patrick and the community of Patrick also, after making mutual oath on the Staff of Jesus and other relics, on the eleventh of the Kalends of January 22 Dec.."
1101 Four Masters "Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, was liberated from fetters by Domhnall, the grandson of Lochlainn, in exchange for his son and his foster-brother, in the daimhliag of Ard-Macha, through the intercession of the successor of Patrick, and all his congregation, after they had mutually sworn on the Bachall-Isa and the relics of the Church, on the eleventh of the Calends of January."
1102 Loch Ce Sord-Choluim-Chille was burned. Donnchadh, son of Echri Ua hAitheidh, royal heir of Uí-Echach, was slain by the Ulidians, in the fifth month after he had profaned the community of Patrick.
1102 Ulster "Donnchadh son of Echrí ua Aitidh, heir designate of Uí Echach, was killed by the Ulaid, i.e. in the fifth month after outraging Patrick."
1102 Loch Ce A hosting by the Cenel-Eoghain to Magh-Cobha. The Ulidians proceeded on that night to the camp, and slew Sitrec Ua Maelfhabhuill, king of Carraig-Brachaidhe and Sitrec, son of Conrach, son of Eoghan, et alii.
1102 Four Masters "Donnchadh, son of Echri Ua Aiteidh, Tanist of Ui-Eathach, was killed by the Ulidians."
1102 Inisfallen The son of Mac Lochlainn with the Cenél Eógain went into Ulaid, and their camp was attacked when unguarded, and the king of Carraig Brachide, namely, Ua Maíl Fhábaill, and the son of Conrach, son of Eógan, and many others were slain.
1102 Ulster "An expedition was made by the Cenél Eógain to Magh Coba. The Ulaid went at night into the encampment and killed Sitriuc ua Maelfabhaill, king of Carraic Brachaidhe, and Sitriuc son of Conrí son of Eogan and others."
1103 Chronicon Scotorum Magnus king of Lochlann and the Innse, a man who attempted to conquer Ireland, was killed on a raid in Ulaid.
1103 Loch Ce A great war between the Cenel-Eoghain and the Ulidians, when Muirchertach O'Briain came with the men of Mumha, and Laighen, and Osraighe, and with the nobles of Connacht, and with the men of Midhe, together with their kings, to Magh-Cobha, to assist the Ulidians. They all went, respectively, to Machaire-Aird-Macha, i.e. to Cill-na-Cornaire, where they were a week laying siege to Ard-Macha. Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, with the men of the North of Erinn, was during the time in Uí-Bresail-Macha, confronting them. When, however, the men of Mumha were weary, Muirchertach proceeded to Aenach-Macha, and to Emhain-Macha, and round to Ard-Macha, when he left eight ounces of gold upon the altar, and promised eight score cows; and he turned back to Magh-Cobha, and left there the Lagenians, and a multitude of the men of Mumha; and he himself went, moreover, on a predatory expedition into Dá-Araidhe, where he lost Donnchadh, son of Toirdhealbhach, and the son of Ua Conchobhair, king of Ciarraighe, and Ua Beóain, et alii optimi. Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, accompanied by the chieftans of Cenel-Conaill and Cenel-Eoghain, and of the whole North, went to Magh-Cobha, to attack the Lagenians. The Lagenians, however, and the Osraighe, and the men of Mumha, and the Foreigners, such as they were, came to meet him and a battle was fought: viz., on the nones of August, and on Wednesday, as regards the day of the week, and on the 29th of the moon, and on the eighth day after coming to Macha, this battle was fought. The men of Leth-Mogha were defeated, and a slaughter of them was committed, and a slaughter of the Lagenians, with Muirchertach Mac Gillacholmog, and with two Ua Lorcains, and with Muirchertach, son of Mac Gormain, et alii; and a slaughter of the Uí-Ceinnsealaigh, with two sons ofMaelmordha, and with Ua Riain, i.e. king of Uí-Drona, et alii; a slaughter of the Osraighe, with Gillapatraic Ruadh, king of Osraighe and with the chieftains of Osraighe likewise; a slaughter of the Foreigners of Ath-cliath, with Trosdan, son of Eric, and, with Pol Adhmann, and with Beollan Armann, et alii; a slaughter of the men of Mumha, with two Ua Brics, i.e. two royal heirs of the Deisi, and with Ua-Failbhe i.e. royal heir of Corca-Dhuibhne, and a dynast of Laighen, i.e. with Ua Muireghaigh, i.e. king of Ciarraighe, together with his son; et alii multi optimi quos causa brevitatis scribere praetermisimus.
1103 Inisfallen Magnus, king of the foreigners, was slain when taken unawares by the Ulaid.
1103 Loch Ce Maghnus, King of Lochlann, was slain on a predatory expedition in Ulidia.
1103 Tigernach "Maghnus, king of Norway and the Isles, a man who attempted to beleaguer Ireland, was killed in Ulster."
1103 Ulster "A great war between the Cenél Eógain and the Ulaid, and Muirchertach ua Briain came with the men of Mumu and Laigin and Osraige and with the nobles of Connacht and the men of Mide with their kings to Mag Coba to assist the Ulaid. They all went to the plain of Ard Macha, i.e. to Cell na Conraire, and were a week beleaguering Ard Macha; Domnall ua Lochlainn with the north of Ireland was for that time in Uí Bresail Macha facing them. Since the men of Mumu were weary, Muirchertach went to Aenach Macha and to Emain and round to Ard Macha, and left eight ounces of gold on the altar and promised eight score cows, and returned again to Magh Coba, i.e. not having obtained what he sought, and left the province of Laigin there and some of the men of Mumu. He himself went on a raid into Dál Araide, and left there dead Donnchad son of Tairdelbach and the son of Ua Conchobuir, king of Ciarraige, and ua Beoáin and other nobles. Domnall ua Lochlainn went with the north of Ireland into Mag Coba to attack the Laigin; the Laigin, however, and the Osraige and the men of Mumu and the foreigners met them just as they were, and give battle, i.e. on Wednesday the Nones 5th of August, the twenty-ninth of the moon, on the day after coming to Ard Macha. Leth Moga, however, was defeated, and slaughter inflicted on them: i.e., slaughter on the Laigin, including Muirchertach son of Gilla Mocholmóc and the two grandsons of Lorcán and Muirchertach grandson of Gormán, and others; a slaughter of the Uí Cheinnselaigh, including the two sons of Mael Mórda, and ua Riain, king of Uí Drona, and others; a slaughter of the Osraige, including Gilla Pátraic Ruad, king of Osraige, and the royal family of Osraige also; a slaughter of the foreigners of Áth Cliath, including Torstain son of Eric and Pól son of Amaind and Beollan Armunn and others; a slaughter of the men of Mumu including the two ua Bric, two heirs designate of the Déisi; and ua Failbe, heir designate of Corco Duibne, and a tributary-king of the Laigin, i.e. Ua Muiredaigh; the king of Ciarraige, with his son; and many others whom for the sake of concision we have passed over. The Cenél Eógain with the north of Ireland returned home with great slaughter and many valuables, including the royal tent and a camlinne and many other valuables."
1103 Ulster "Magnus, king of Lochlann, was killed on a raid in Ulaid."
1103 Four Masters "A great war broke out between the Cinel-Eoghain and the Ulidians; and Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, Leinster, and Osraighe, and with the chiefs of Connaught, and the men of Meath, with their kings, proceeded to Magh-Cobha, to relieve the Ulidians. Both parties went all into Machaire-Arda-Macha, i.e. to Cill-na-gCornaire, and were for a week laying siege to, Ard-Macha. Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, with the people of the north of Ireland, was during this time in Ui-Breasail-Macha, confronting, them face to face, so that he prevented the people of the four provinces of Ireland from committing depredation or aggression any further in the province. When the men of Munster were wearied, Muircheartach proceeded to Aenach-Macha, to Eamhain, and round to Ard-Macha, and left eight ounces of gold upon the altar, and promised eight score cows, and returned to Magh-Cobha, and left the people of the province of Leinster and numbers of the men of Munster there. He himself afterwards set out on a predatory excursion into Dá-Araidhe, with the King of Meath and the King of Connaught; and Donnchadh, son of Toirdhealbhach Ua Briain, was slain on this expedition, as were the son of Ua Conchobhair Ciarraighe, Peatadeamhain Ua Beoain, Donncuan Ua Duibhcinn, and a great many others of the nobility along with them. Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, with the Clanna-Neill of the North, proceeded to Magh-Cobha, to attack the camp of the Leinstermen; and the Leinstermen, the Osraighi, and the Munstermen, assembled together all the forces they had, and fought a spirited battle in Magh-Cobha, on Tuesday, the Nones of August, on the eight day after their coming into that plain. The people of Leath-Mhogha were, however, defeated, and slaughter made of them, viz. the slaughter of the Leinstermen, with Muircheartach Mac Gillamocholmog, King of Leinster, with the two Ua Lorcains, i.e. Murchadh, King of Ui-Muireadhaigh, and his brother, and with Muircheartach Mac Gormain, with a great number of others besides them; the slaughter of the Ui-Ceinnsealaigh, together with the two sons of Maelmordha, and Rian, lord of Ui-Drona, and many others also; the slaughter of the Osraighi in general, with Gillaphadraig Ruadh and the chieftains of Osraighe; the slaughter of the foreigners of Ath-cliath, with Thorstan, son of Eric, with Pol, son of Amann, and Beollan, son of Armunn, with a countless number of others; the slaughter of the men of Munster, with the two Ua Brics, i.e. two tanists of the Deisi; and with Ua Failbhe, Tanist of Corca-Dhuibhne and Erri of Leinster; with Ua Muireadhaigh, lord of Ciarraighe, with his son, and many others of the nobility, which it would be tediousto enumerate. The Clanna-Neill of the North, namely, the Cinel-Eoghain and Cinel-Conaill, returned to their forts victoriously ancl triumphantly, with valuable jewels and much wealth, together with the royal tent, the standard, and many other precious jewels."
1103 Four Masters "Maghnus, King of Lochlann and the Islands, and a man who had contemplated the invasion of all Ireland, was slain by the Ulidians, with a slaughter of his people about him, on a predatory excursion."
1104 Ulster "A defeat was inflicted by the Ulaid on the Dál Araide, and in it fell Dubcenn ua Damán in a counter-attack."
1104 Loch Ce A hosting by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn to Magh-Cobha, when he obtained the hostages of Ulidia; and he proceeded to Temhair, and burned a large part of Uí-Laeghaire, but gave protection to some of them however.
1104 Four Masters "A battle was gained by the Ulidians over the Dá-Araidhe, wherein Duibhceann Ua Daimhin was slain in the heat of the conflict."
1104 Ulster "An army was brought by Domnall ua Lochlainn to Mag Coba, and he took the hostages of the Ulaid, and went to Temair and burnt a great part of Uí Loegaire, and gave them protection."
1107 Chronicon Scotorum Conchobor Cisénach ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was killed.
1107 Tigernach "Conchobhar Cisenach grandson of Eochaid, king of Ulster, was killed.king of Ulster."
1107 Loch Ce Conchobhar, grandson of Donnsleibhe, royal heir of Uladh, was slain by the men of Fernmhagh.
1107 Ulster "Conchobor son of Donn Sléibe, heir designate of Ulaid, was killed by the men of Fernmag."
1107 Four Masters "Conchobhar (i.e. Conchobhar Cisenanch), son of Donnsleibhe, royal heir of Ulidia, was killed by the men of Fearnmhagh."
1107 Inisfallen Conchobar Cisénach, son of Donn Sleibe Ua hEochada, was slain.
1108 Chronicon Scotorum Goll Garbraige ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was killed by ua Matgamna.
1108 Loch Ce A house was taken by Ua Mathghamhna and Ua Maelruanaidh over Goll Garbraighe, i.e. the king of Uladh, i.e. Eochaidh, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, and he was beheaded by them.
1108 Ulster "A house was stormed by Ua Mathgamna and ua Mael Ruanaid against Goll Garbraidhe, i.e. Eochaid son of Donn Sléibe ua Eochadha, i.e. the king of Ulaid, and he was beheaded by them."
1108 Tigernach "A raid by the Ulaid into Ua Meith, and they rifled it all save a little."
1108 Inisfallen Goll Garbraige, king of Ulaid, was treacherously slain by Ua Mathgamna.
1108 Tigernach "Goll Garbraidhe Ua hEochadha, king of Ulster, was killed by Ua Mathghamhna, king of Ulster."
1108 Four Masters "A house was taken by Ua Mathghamhna and Ua Maelruanaidh upon Goll Garbhraighe, King of Ulidia, i.e. Eochaidh, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha; and he was beheaded by them."
1108 Four Masters "A predatory excursion was made by the Ulidians into Ui-Meith; and they plundered it all, except a small portion."
1109 Loch Ce A hosting by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn accompanied by the men of the North of Erinn, to Sliabh-Fuaid; but Ceallach, comarb of Patrick, made a year's peace between O'Briain and Mac Lachlainn; and the men of the North of Erinn, together with the Cenel-Conaill and Cenel-Eoghain, went afterwards to Magh-Uí-Bresail, to attack the Ulidians who were in Magh-Cobha but the Ulidians gave them the three hostages whom they themselves selected.
1109 Four Masters "An army was led by Domhnall Mac Lochlainn, with the people of the north of Ireland, to Sliabh-Fuaid; but Ceallach, successor of Patrick, made a year's peace between Mac Lochlainn and Ua Briain; after which the people of the north of Ireland, with the Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, proceeded to Magh-hUa-Breasail, to attack the Ulidians who were in Magh-Cobha; and the Ulidians gave them the three hostages which they themselves selected."
1109 Ulster "An army was brought by Domnall grandson of Lochlainn also, with the north of Ireland, to Sliab Fuait, and Cellach, successor of Patrick, made a year's peace between ua Briain and ua Lochlainn, and the north of Ireland went after that to Mag ua mBresail against the Ulaid who were in Mag Coba, and the Ulaid gave them the three hostages they themselves chose."
1110 Ulster The Ulaid plundered Mucnám completely.
1111 Loch Ce A hosting by the Ulidians to Telach-óg, when they cut down its sacred trees.
1111 Four Masters "An army was led by the Ulidians to Tealach-Og, and they cut down its old trees: a predatory excursion was made by Niall Ua Lochlainn, and he carried off three thousand cows, in revenge of it."
1111 Loch Ce A predatory excursion by Niall Mac Lachlainn, who carried off three thousand cows in revenge for them.
1111 Inisfallen The Ulaid [went] on a hosting into Cenél Eógain and cut down the trees of Tulach Óc. And the son of Mac Lochlainn [was] in Ulaid, and he plundered it as far as Droichet na Feirsi, and hostages were afterwards obtained from the Ulaid.
1111 Ulster "An expedition was made by the Ulaid to Telach Óc, and they cut down its sacred trees. A raid was made by Niall ua Lochlainn, and carried off a thousand or three thousand cows in revenge for them."
1111 Four Masters "A meeting between Domhnall Mac Lochlainn and Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, and they made peace and friendship with each other; and the Ulidians delivered hostages to Domhnall, for paying him his own demand."
1111 Ulster "Lightning burned Dún dá Lethglas, both ráith and trian."
1111 Loch Ce A convention between Domhnall Mac Lachlainn and Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, when they made a full peace; and the Ulidians gave hostages to Domhnall, for the payment of his own demand.
1111 Ulster "A meeting was held between Domnall ua Lochlainn and Donnchad ua Eochada at the Cuan, and they made full peace and the Ulaid gave Domnall ua Lochlainn hostages for his own tribute."
1113 Loch Ce A hosting by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, with the nobles of Cenel-Conaill and Cenel-Eoghain, and the Airghialla, to Glenn-Righe; and they expelled Donnchadh from the sovereignty of Uladh, and divided Uladh between Ua Mathghamhna and the sons of Donnsleibhe; by himself
1113 Loch Ce A hosting by Muirchertach Ua Briain, with the men of Mumha, and the Lagenians and Connachtmen, to Magh-Cobha, to aid Donnchadh.
1113 Loch Ce Another hosting by Domhnall Mac Lachlainn, with the men of Cenel-Conall and of Cenel-Eoghain, and the Airghialla, to Magh-Cobha likewise, to aid the Ulidians; and there was a danger of battle between them, until the comarb of Patrick separated them under the semblance of peace.
1113 Loch Ce Donnchadh Ua hEochadha was blinded by Eochaidh Ua Mathghamhna and the Ulidians
1113 Ulster "An army was brought by Domnall ua Lochlainn with the Cenél Eógain and the Cenél Conaill and the Airgialla to Glenn Rige, and they drove Donnchad from the kingship of the Ulaid and divided Ulaid between ua Mathgamna and the sons of Donn Sléibe, reserving Dál Amide and Uí Echach however to himself. An army was brought by Muirchertach ua Briain with the men of Mumu and the Laigin and the Connachta to Mag Coba to help Donnchad. An army was brought also by Domnall ua Lochlainn with the aforesaid armies to Magh Coba also to help the Ulaid, and there was a likelihood of a battle between them until Cellach, successor of Patrick, separated them in a semblance of peace. Donnchad ua Eochada, however, was blinded by Eochaid ua Mathgamna and the Ulaid."
1113 Four Masters "An army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, with the chiefs of Cinel-Eoghain, Cinel-Conaill, and Airghialla, to Gleann-Righe; and they banished Donnchadh from the kingdom of Ulidia, and they divided Ulidia between Ua Mathghamhna and the son of Ua Duinnsleibhe, he himself retaining Dá-Araidhe and Ui-Eathach."
1113 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain, with the men of Munster, Leinster, and Connaught, to Magh-Cobha, to aid Donnchadh. Another army, composed of the forces before mentioned, was marched by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn to Magh-Cobha, to relieve the Ulidians; and there was a challenge of battle between them, but the successor of Patrick separated them, under the semblance of peace and tranquillity. Donnchadh Ua hEochadha was blinded by Eochaidh Ua Mathghamhna and the Ulidians. An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Briain and the people of Leath-Mhogha, both laity and clergy, to Greanog. Domhnall, grandson of Lochlainn, with the chiefs of the north of Ireland, proceeded to Cluain-caein, in Feara-Rois; and both armies remained for the space of a month in readiness, confronting each other, until the successor of Patrick, with the Staff of Jesus, made a year's peace between them."
1113 Inisfallen The slaying of Donnchad, son of Eochaid, by the Ulaid.
1114 Chronicon Scotorum Donnchad ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was blinded by ua Mathgamna, and the kingship passed to ua Mathgamma.
1114 Ulster "An army was brought by Domnall ua Lochlainn to Rath Cennaigh, and Eochaid ua Mathgamna with the Ulaid came into his house, and Donnchad ua Loingsigh with the Dál Araide and Aed ua Ruairc with the men of Bréifne and Murchad ua Mael Sechlainn with the men of Mide. They went thereafter together over Áth Luain to Dún Leodha, and Tairdelbach ua Conchobuir with the Connachta, and Niall ua Lochlainn, his own son, with the Cenél Conaill, joined his assembly. They all went thereafter to Telach ua nDedaigh in Dál Cais, and they and the men of Mumu made a year's truce. Domnall ua Lochlainn returned home through Connacht."
1114 Ulster "Aed son of Donnchad ua Eochada, heir designate of Ulaid, Donnchad ua Loingsigh, king of Dál Araide, Ua Canannán, i.e. Ruaidrí, heir designate of Cenél Conaill, Muirchertach ua Lochlainn, heir designate of Ailech, were unjustly killed."
1114 Loch Ce Aedh, son of Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, royal heir of Uladh, mortuus est.
1114 Four Masters "Aedh, son of Donnchadh Ua hEochadha, royal heir of Ulidia, died."
1114 Tigernach "Donnchadh Ua heochadha, king of Ulster, was blinded by Ua Mathghamhna, who took the kingship to himself."
1118 Ulster "The defeat of Cenn Daire was inflicted on the Uí Echach of Ulaid by Murchad ua Ruadacán, and slaughter was inflicted on them."
1118 Inisfallen The son of Gilla Odar Ua Duibenaig was slain by Domnall Ua Títh, and that same Domnall banished his father, i.e. Dodan Birach(?); and Ua Mathgamna, king of Ulaid, was banished by the son of Donn Sléibe, and the. Ulaid were put to flight(?) by the men of Fernmag.
1121 Inisfallen The Ulaid took a great prey from the son of Mac Lochlainn. A great slaughter [was inflicted] on them, and the prey was turned back.
1122 Chronicon Scotorum Aed son of Donnslébhe ua Eochadha, king of Ulaid, was killed by ua Mathgamna in a battle.
1122 Tigernach "Aodh son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha, king of Ulster, was killed in battle by Ua Mathghamhna."
1122 Ulster "A great raid was made by Conchobor ua Lochlainn and the Cenél Eogain, and they reached Cell Ruaidh in Ulaid, and brought away an innumerable spoil of cattle."
1122 Inisfallen The Cenél Eógain took great preys from the Ulaid at the same time.
1123 Ulster "Flann ua Duibinnsi, superior of Lugmad, Cú Caisil ua Cerbaill, king of Fernmag, Mael Muire ua Condubhán, superior of Daire Lubhráin, Donn Sléibe son of Cathalán, happiness and prosperity of all the Ulaid, died."
1124 Four Masters "Aedh Ua Mathghamhna, royal heir of Ulidia, fell by the men of Fearnmhagh."
1126 McCarthy A.D. 1126. A battle between Eochaidh Ó Mathghamhna, king of Ulaidh, and Aodh Mac Duinn Shléibhe, the other king of Ulaidh, in which they were both killed, with slaughter of the Ulaidh.
1127 Chronicon Scotorum A battle between two kings of Ulaid in which fell Aed ua Mathgamna and Niall son of Donnslébhe ua Eochadha.
1127 Loch Ce A battle between the Ulidians themselves, when two kings of Ulidia, viz.: Niall, son of Donnsleibhe (and a slaughter of the Ulidians about him), and Eochaidh Ua Mathghamhna, were slain in the mutual wounding of the battle.
1127 Ulster "A battle took place between the Ulaid themselves, in which two kings of the Ulaid fell, i.e. Niall son of Done Sléibe, with a slaughter of the Ulaid around him, and Eochaid ua Mathgamna in a counter-attack."
1127 Inisfallen A battle was fought by the Ulaid among themselves, and their two kings, i.e. Ua Mathgamna, and the sons of Donn Sléibe, fell therein, and there was a terrible slaughter of the Ulaid.
1127 Tigernach "A battle between two kings of Ulster, wherein fell Aodh Ua Mathghamhna and Niall son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha, king of Ulster."
1127 Inisfallen A hosting by the son of Mac Lochlainn into Ulaid, and he took hostages from the Ulaid
1127 Four Masters "A battle between the Ulidians themselves, in which two kings of Ulidia were slain, namely, Aedh Ua Mathghamhna, and Niall, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha; and a slaughter was made of the Ulidians along with them."
1128 Four Masters "Ceinneidigh, son of Aedh Mac Duinnsleibhe, King of Ulidia, was killed."
1129 Ulster Gilla Mo-Chonna ua Duibdírma was killed by the Ulaid in Inis Taiti.
1129 Inisfallen The son of Donnchad Ua hEochada, king of Ulaid, was killed in a house [set] on fire by the Ulaid.
1129 Inisfallen A great raid by Conchobar, son of Mac Lochlainn, in Ulaid.
1129 Inisfallen The plundering of Inis Taite by the Ulaid, in which --- gel, son of Mac Lochlainn, Mac Caíme Ua Flainn, and many others were slain.
1129 Inisfallen A great raiding by the Ulaid in Dál Araide, in which Ua hAmráin was slain at Camus Comgaill.
1130 McCarthy A hosting by Conchobhar son of Ardghar Mac Lochlainn along with Cinéal Eóghain and Cinéal Conaill and the Oirghialla into Ulaidh, and they plundered Druim Both, including round tower, and oratory, and books. The Ulaidh came to Cnoc Cluana to meet them in battle, and the Ulaidh were defeated and slaughter inflicted on them.
1130 Four Masters "Lochlainn Ua Maelruanaidh, royal heir of Ulidia, was killed."
1130 McCarthy A hosting by Conchobhar Ó Lochlainn with the Ulaidh, the Oirghialla, and Cinéal Conaill into Connacht, and the Connachtmen and the Cinéal Conaill fought a battle on Sliabh Seaghsa, in which Cinéal Conaill were defeated, and An Garbhánach Ó Baoighill and Conn Ó Maoil Ghaoithe killed, with slaughter of Cinéal Conaill around them. Toirdhealbhach son of Ruaidhrí, king of Connacht, and Conchobhar son of Mac Lochlainn, king of Oileach, made peace, and the forces dispersed to their own territories on every side.
1130 McCarthy The Ulaidh and the men of Fearnmhagh [went] beyond Athlone into the territory of Fir Rois, and Tighearnán Ó Ruairc with the Craobh Fearnmhuighe met them at Muine Uachtair Imrimhe, where they fought a battle, in which the Ulaidh were defeated, and Raghnall Ó hEochadha, king of Ulaidh, Cú Midhe Ó Críochain, king of Fearnmhagh and Oirghialla, Aodh, his son, and Donn Sléibhe Ó hOireachtaigh, king of Uí Mhéith, were killed, with slaughter of the Ulaidh, [the men of] Fearnmhagh, and the Uí Mhéith.
1130 Loch Ce A hosting by Mac Lachlainn and the men of the North of Erinn, into Ulidia, and the Ulidians assembled to give them battle; but the Ulidians were defeated and slaughtered, together with Aedh Ua Loingsigh, king of Dá-Araidhe, and with Gillapatraic Mac Serridh, king of Dá-Buinne, and with Dubhrailbhe Mac Cartain, and many besides. They plundered the country, moreover, as far as the east of the Ard, both territory and church, and carried off a thousand captives, vel paulo plus, and many thousands of cows and horses.
1130 Ulster "An army was brought by Conchobor ua Lochlainn and the north of Ireland into Ulaid, and the Ulaid gathered to give them battle. The Ulaid, however, were defeated, and slaughter inflicted on them, including Aed ua Loingsigh, king of Dál Araide, and Gilla Pátraic ua Serraigh, king of Dál Buinne, and Dub Railbe son of Cairtin, and many others. They plunder the country as far as Airthir na hArda, both laity and church, and brought away a thousand prisoners or a little more, and many thousand cows and horses. The nobles of Ulaid with their king then went to Ard Macha to meet Conchobor, and they made peace and mutual oath, and left hostages."
1130 Inisfallen A battle-rout of the Ulaid by Conchobar, son of Mac Lochlainn, and by the Cenél Eógain, and he [Conchobar] took their hostages in addition to their principal chiefs(?)
1130 Four Masters "An army was led by Ua Lochlainn into Ulidia. The Ulidians assembled to give them battle. When they approached each other, a fierce battle was fought between them. The Ulidians were finally defeated and slaughtered, together with Aedh Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dá-Araidhe; Gillaphadraig Mac Searraigh, lord of Dá-Buinne; Dubhrailbhe Mac Artain;and many others besides them: and they plundered the country as far as the east of Ard, both lay and ecclesiastical property, and they carried off a thousand prisoners, and many thousand cows and horses. The chief men of Ulidia, with their lords, afterwards came to Ard-Macha, to meet Conchobhar; and they made peace, and took mutual oaths, and they left hostages with him."
1130 Loch Ce The chief men of Ulidia, however, came afterwards,9 with their king, to Ard Macha, to meet Conchobhar, and they made peace and took mutual oaths, and they the Ulidians left hostages.
1131 Chronicon Scotorum A great army was led by Conchobor ua of Lochlainn, king of the north of Ireland, with the Ulaid and the Airgialla along with him, into Connachta, and he came as far as Corrsliab and the Connachta attacked him in the Segais and the Cénél Conaill were defea
1131 McCarthy The Ulaidh and the men of Fearnmhagh [went] beyond Athlone into the territory of Fir Rois, and Tighearnán Ó Ruairc with the Craobh Fearnmhuighe met them at Muine Uachtair Imrimhe, where they fought a battle, in which the Ulaidh were defeated, and Raghnall Ó hEochadha, king of Ulaidh, Cú Midhe Ó Críochain, king of Fearnmhagh and Oirghialla, Aodh, his son, and Donn Sléibhe Ó hOireachtaigh, king of Uí Mhéith, were killed, with slaughter of the Ulaidh, [the men of] Fearnmhagh, and the Uí Mhéith.
1131 Tigernach "An alliance was made between Conn's Half and Mogh's Half to invade Connacht at the same time. So the forces of the North, seven battalions, came over Assaroe to the Curlews and Segais. The king of Ireland mustered Síl Muireadhaigh against them, and the Ua Beicc despatched a body of young soldiers into the Segais to await them, and they delivered and attack upon the and routed Tyrconnell and Tyrone, and the whole army, except a battalion of Ulstermen, which had at first gone through the wood. So a slaughter was inflicted upon them, including the Garbánach Ua Baoighill and Conn Ua Maolgaoithe and many others, and they lost their horses and their weapons and their armour. The king then granted a little truce, that night, and they made peace with the Sá­ol Muireadhaigh, agreeing that never again should Connacht be invaded by the army of the southern half of Ireland. To the folk of the North Toirdhealbhach Conchobhair gave order how they should repair to their homes, to wit, the men of Tyrconnell and Tyrone, including the son of Mac Lochlainn, over Assaroe, with a party of the nobles of Connacht to escort them, and the Ulaid with the troops of the north-east of Ireland were, by the generosity of the Connachtmen, billeted in Magh Aá­ for three days and three nights, and then escorted to Ardee. But a conflict took place on the Plain of Conaille, between them and Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, king of the Uá­ Briáin and Conmaicne, he having driven a prey out of Ulster in their absence. The Ulaid and Airgá
1131 Four Masters "An army was led by Conchobhair, son of Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, by the people of the north of Ireland, and the Ulidians, into Connaught; and the Connaughtmen made an attack upon the rear of the army, in the vicinity of Seaghais (i.e. Coirrshliabh), and a battle was fought between them; and Conn Ua Maelgaeithe, Garbhanach Ua Baeighill, and a number of others, were there slain. They met, however, on the following day, at Loch-Ce, and made a year's peace."
1131 Four Masters "In the absence of this army a predatory excursion was made by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, and the men of Breifne, into Cuailgne; and they plundered Ui-Meith. The Ulidians and the South Airghialla, however, returned homewards across Ath-Luain, and fell in with the depredators in Magh-Conaille, where a battle was fought between them, in which Raghnall Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia; Cumidhe Ua Crichain, lord of Fearnmhagh, with his son; Donnsleibhe Ua hInnreachtaigh, lord of Ui-Meith; and many others besides them, were slain."
1131 Loch Ce A battle was fought, in which Raghnall Ua hEochadha, king of Uladh, and Cumhidhe Ua Crichain, king of Fernmhagh, and his son, and Donnsleible Ua hInnrechtaigh, king of Uí-Meith, et alii multi, were slain.
1136 Four Masters "Conchobhar, son of Domhnall Ua Lochlainn, who was first lord of Aileach, and king of all the north, both Cinel-Conaill and Cinel-Eoghain, Ulidians and Airghialla, and also royal heir of Ireland, was killed by the men of Magh-Itha, by treachery."
1136 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach into Ulidia, and he obtained the hostages of the Ulidians to secure their obedience to him; however, some of the Ulidians, under the conduct of Ua Duinnsleibhe, made an attack upon some of the army, and slew Ua hInneirghe, chief of the Cuileanntrach. Ua Loingsigh, lord of Dá-Araidhe, was slain by the Cinel-Eoghain."
1141 Four Masters "The Ulstermen of all Leinster returned to their own territories, i.e. into Ulster, and this was a sign of vengeance in Leinster"
1145 McCarthy A hosting by Muircheartach son of Niall Ó Lochlainn and Donnchadh Ó Cearbhaill into Ulaidh, and they reached Tráigh Dúin Droma after a defeat of the Ulaidh. They plundered and burned Leath Cathail, and carried off four hostages from the Ulaidh, after leaving four kings over them.
1147 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach Mac Neill Ua Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and the Airghialla, into Ulidia. The Ulidians were encamped at the brink of Uchdearg, to meet them; but they abandoned the camp to the Cinel-Eoghain and the Airghialla, who pursued them till they reached the shore of Dun-droma, in Leath-Chathail. The Ulidians gave them battle there, on the day of the festival of Paul and Peter; but they were defeated, and a great number of them slain, together with Archu Ua Flathrai, lord of Leath-Chathail. After this the forces plundered and burned all Leath-Chathail, and carried off hostages from the Ulidians."
1148 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, by the Cinel-Eoghain and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, and the Airghialla, into Ulidia; and they carried off the hostages of the Ulidians, together with the son of the King of Ulidia, and left four lords over Ulidia on that occasion. The Ulidians and Airghialla turned against Mac Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain after this."
1148 Four Masters "Another army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn and the Cinel-Eoghain, across Tuaim, into Ulidia; and he expelled Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe from Ulidia, and placed Donnchadh in his place; and they proceeded on this occasion into Machaire-Chonaill, and burned the plain, except the churches only, which were protected by the successor of Patrick."
1148 Four Masters "An army was also led by Tighearnan Ua Ruairc and Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill into Ulidia, as far as Craebh-Tealcha; and they plundered the country, and placed Cuuladh in his kingdom again; however, he was immediately expelled by the Ulidians themselves."
1148 Four Masters "A meeting was held at Ard-Macha by Ua Lochlainn, with the chieftains of the Cinel-Eoghain; by O'Cearbhaill, with the chieftains of the Airghialla, and the chief men of Ulidia, with their lords, and made perfect peace under the Staff of Jesus, in the presence of the successor of Patrick and his clergy; and they left hostages with O'Lochlainn. The hostages of the Cinel-Conaill were also in the hands of Ua Lochlainn."
1149 Chronicon Scotorum An army was led by Muirchertach son of Niall grandson of Lochlainn with the Cenél Conaill and Cenél Eogaín and the Airgialla into Ulaid and attacked the Ulaid, both churches and peoples. He brought away captives with him thereafter.
1149 Tigernach "A hosting by Muircheartach son of Niall son of Lochlann, together with the men of Tyrconnell, Tyrone and Oriel, into Ulster, where they harried both churches and districts, and he afterward took hostages with him."
1149 Four Masters "Cuuladh, i.e. the son of Conchobhar, came into Ulidia again, and expelled Donnchadh from the chieftainship of the upper part of Ulidia: and Ua Mathghamhna and the two sons of Aedh Mac Duinnsleibhe (Donnchadh and Murchadh) made an attack upon his camp, but they were defeated by Cuuladh, and Murchadh was killed by him."
1149 Four Masters "An army was led by the Cinel-Eoghain to Magh-an-chairn, to expel Conchobhar; but Ua Cearbhaill prevented them, for he delivered his own son up to them, for the sake of Ulidia."
1149 Four Masters "Another army was led by the son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, being joined by the people of the north of Ireland, namely, the Cinel-Conaill, the Cinel-Eoghain, and the Airghialla, into Ulidia; they plundered all the upper part of Ulidia, from the harbour of Snamh-Aighneach to Droichet-na-Feirtsi. A party of them went upon the islands of Loch Cuan, and they plundered Inis-Cumscraidh, Leathghlais, Cill-Aedhain, Magh-bile, Beanchor, and all the other churches of the country, except Dun Leathghlais and Sabhall. Ua Duinnsleibhe afterwards came into the house of Ua Lochlainn, and delivered his own son up to him as a hostage, and whatever other hostages he demanded. After this they returned back to their houses, with a countless cattle spoil, and with many prisoners."
1149 Four Masters "A predatory incursion was made by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill and Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe into Breagha, and they carried off many spoils. The men of Breagha afterwards came in pursuit of them, and they plundered the half of Tearmann-Feichin, and carried off some of the cattle of the monks."
1150 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach, son of Niall Ua Lochlainn, with the Cinel-Eoghain and the Ulidians, to relieve Ua Cearbhaill and Ua Ruairc, to Dun-Lochad, in Laeghaire; and the foreigners made a year's peace between Leath-Chuinn and Leath-Mhogha."
1153 McCarthy A hosting by Muircheartach son of Niall Ó Lochlainn, king of Cinéal Eóghain, Donnchadh Ó Cearbhaill with the Ulaidh and Cinéal Conaill, and Toirdhealbhach son of Diarmaid Ó Briain to Áth Maighne against Tadhg Ó Briain, and they threw them [i.e. the forces of Tadhg Ó Briain] out of their three encampments and killed nine hundred of them. Toirdhealbhach Ó Briain and [the men of] the north of Ireland stayed at Teach Tille that night, celebrating the triumph.
1153 Four Masters "The visitation of Dá-Cairbre and Ui-Eathach-Uladh was made by Flaithbheartach Ua Brolchain, successor of Colum-Cille; and he received a horse from every chieftain, a sheep from every hearth; a screaball, a horse, and five cows, from the lord Ua Duinnsleibhe, and an ounce of gold from his wife."
1156 Ulster "A hosting by Muircertach Ua Lochlainn into Ulidia, so that he took away pledges to his choice. And it is upon that hosting also Ua Inneirghi was killed on a surprise party."
1156 Four Masters "The Ulidians turned against Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, and proclaimed war upon him."
1157 Four Masters "Cuuladh Ua Duinnsleibhe Ui-Eochadha, King of Ulidia, died, after penance, at Dun-da-leathghlas, and was interred at Dun itself."
1157 Tigernach "Cú Uladh Ua hEochadha, king of Ulster, died in Downpatrick."
1158 McCarthy A hosting by Muircheartach son of Niall [Ó Lochlainn] with the Oirghialla, the Ulaidh, and Cinéal Conaill into Connacht, and they destroyed Dún Mór and many other towns, and returned home without peace or battle.
1158 Four Masters "An army was led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, with the Ulidians and Airghialla, into Tir-Conaill, and they plundered the country, both churches and territories; but the Cinel-Conaill made an attack upon the camp of the Ulidians, and slew Aedh Ua Duinnsleibhe Ui Eochadha, King of Ulidia, and the Gall Ua Searraigh, and many others of the nobility and commonalty besides them."
1159 Ulster "A hosting by Muircertach Ua Lachlainn with the Cenel-Eogain and with the Airgialla and the Ulidians and Cenel-Conaill into Connacht, so that they burned Dun-mor and Dun-Ciaraidh and Dun-na-nGall and wasted much of the land besides, until they returned to their own country after that, without peace, without pledges. And it is on that occasion they gained over to them Ua Gailmredhaigh and the Cenel-Maien."
1161 Ulster "A hosting by Muircertach Ua Lochlainn into Tir-Briuin: the way they went [was] past the Confluence of Cluain-Eois, through the length of the country, until Tigernan [Ua Ruairc] abandoned his camp to them. From that to the Well of Messan. The Airgialla and Ulidians [came] to that place to him and Mac Murchadha with the Leinstermen and a battalion of Foreigners [came], so that they all went into the Plain of Tethbha. Then Ua Conchobuir came from the west, across the Shannon and gave pledges to Ua Lochlainn and thereupon Ua Lochlainn gave his entire Fifth [i.e. Province] to him."
1164 McCarthy A hosting by Muircheartach son of Niall Ó Lochlainn with the men of Fearnmhagh, the Cinéal Conaill, and the [Cinéal] Eóghain into Ulaidh. They destroyed the monastery of the monks of Newry, and plundered Sabhall Pádraig in Rinn Móin, Downpatrick, Aointreabh, Baile Cluig Comhghaill, all Ulaidh, and almost all Dál n-Araidhe, and they banished Domhnall son of Cú Uladh [Mac Duinn Shléibhe] from the kingship of Ulaidh.
1164 Tigernach "Dabid -  son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha was treacherously killed by the Ua­ Eachach.
1164 Four Masters "David, son of Donnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, was killed by the Ui-Eathach-Uladh, by treachery."
1165 McCarthy Muircheartach son of Niall Ó Lochlainn, king of Oileach, captured Eochaidh son of Cú Uladh Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh, his own gossip, at Camus Comhghaill, in his Easter house, after they had been at the same guest-table up to that, and he carried him off to Inis Aonaigh and blinded him there, in violation of the protection of Patrick's coarb, the Bachall Íosa, Clog an Udhachta, Soisgéala Mártain, Míosach Cairnigh, the three shrines in Teampall na Sgrín, together with the relics of the north of Ireland, and in violation of the protection of Donnchadh son of Cú Chaisil Ó Cearbhaill, king of Oirghialla, together with the nobles of the north of Ireland, including Cinéal Conaill and Cinéal Eóghain, laymen and clergy. An account reached Ó Cearbhaill of this violation of his protection and of the blinding of his foster-son. He made peace with Ruaidhrí Ó Conchobhair, king of Connacht, and Tighearnán Ó Ruairc, and taking with him the Oirghialla south of Sliabh Beatha, the Conmhaicne, and the Uí Bhriúin, he went into Tír Eóghain. Muircheartach son of Niall [Ó Lochlainn] was at Teallach Óg, and he came to Fiodh Ó nEachach to meet Ó Cearbhaill, and they fought a battle there in which Cinéal Eóghain were defeated, and Muircheartach son of Niall Ó Lochlainn, king of Oileach, was killed and his head cut off for the [outraged] honour of Jesus, Patrick, and Ó Cearbbaill. Ó Cearbhaill went from there to Magh nImchláir, and Aodh Ó Néill proclaimed his kingship of Cinéal Eóghain.
1165 Tigernach "A hosting by the son of MacLochlainn into Ulster and he ravaged the land, both church and district, and took hostages of Ulster, and banished the son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochaidh, and killed the son of Giolla Easpaig, and Inis Lochá¡in was ravaged by him and destroyed."
1165 Four Masters "The Ulidians began to turn against Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, and proceeded with a force against the Ui-Meith, and carried off cows, and slew many persons. They made another deprecatory irruption upon the Ui-Breasail-Airthir, and another upon the Dá-Riada. A great army was afterwards led by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn, consisting of the Cinel-Conaill, Cinel-Eoghain, and Airghialla, into Ulidia; and they plundered and spoiled the whole country, except the principal churches of Ulidia; and they made a countless slaughter of men, and slew, among others, Eachmarcach Mac Gilla-Epscoib and Ua Lomain; and they banished Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe from Ulidia, after having deprived him of his kingdom; and all the Ulidians gave their hostages to Ua Lochlainn for his royal power."
1165 Tigernach "Eochaidh son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha was taken prisoner by Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, and cast again into prison, and the kingship of Ulster was given to him by the son of Mac Lochlainn for gold and hostages."
1165 Ulster "The turning of the Ulidians upon Ua Lochlainn [took place] and a foray [was made] by them upon the Ui-Meith, so that they took away many cows and killed a multitude of persons. A foray also [was made] by them upon the eastern Ui-Bresail and another foray upon Dá-riatai."
1165 Four Masters "Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn proceeded with the Cinel-Eoghain to Inis-Lochain, and burned and destroyed the island. The Cinel-Eoghain afterwards returned to their houses in triumph, with vast spoils and many ships. Ua Lochlainn then went to Ard-Macha, whither Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, and Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe, came to meet Muircheartach, to request that he would again restore Mac Duinnsleibhe to his kingdom. Ua Lochlainn gave him the kingdom, in consideration of receiving the hostages of all Ulidia; and Eochaidh gave him a son of every chieftain in Ulidia, and his own daughter, to be kept by Ua Lochlainn as a hostage; and many jewels were given him, together with the sword of the son of the Earl. He also gave up the territory of Bairche to Ua Lochlainn, who immediately granted it to Ua Cearbhaill, i.e. Donnchadh; and a townland was granted to the clergy of Sabhall, for the luck of the reign of Mac Lochlainn."
1165 Ulster "A hosting by Muircertach Ua Lochlainn, [along with] both [Cenel-] Cona[i]ll and [Cenel-] Eoga[i]n and the Airgialla, into Ulidia, so that they harried all the country, except, the chief churches of the Ulidians and killed a countless number of them, including Echmarcach, son of Mac Gilla-espuic and including Ua Lomanaigh and they expelled Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] from Ulidia. And Ua Lochlainn gave the kingship to Donnsleibhe [Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua Eochadha] and all the Ulidians gave their pledges to Ua Lochlainn, through the might of his regal power "
1165 Ulster "Diarmait Mac Artain, chief of Clann-Fogartaigh, hospitality and benefaction of all Ui-Echach, died."
1165 Ulster "Eochaidh [Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua Eochadha] again attempts to obtain the kingship of Ulidia; but the Ulidians expelled him through fear of Ua Lochlainn and he was fettered by Donnchadh Ua Cerbaill, arch-king of Airgialla, by order of Ua Lochlainn."
1165 Ulster "Another hosting by Muircertach Ua Lochlainn along with the Cenel-Eogain to Inis-lachain, so that they burned the Island [Inis-lachain] and razed it. And all Ulidia gave their pledges to Ua Lochlainn. After that, the Cenel-Eogain around Ua Lochlainn come to their houses with great triumph and with many ships and numerous treasures beside. From here Ua Lochlainn [goes] to Ard-Macha. After that, Donnchadh Ua Cerbaill, arch-king of Airgialla and Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] come into the presence of Ua Lochlainn, to ask for the kingship for [Eochaidh] Mac Duinnsleibhe, so that Ua Lochlainn gave the entire [kingship] to Mac Duinnsleibhe, in return for the pledges of all Ulidia. So that Mac Duinnsleibhe gave the son of every chief of Ulidia and his own daughter in pledge to O'Lochlainn. And there were given to him [Ua Lochlainn] many treasures, including the sword of the son of the Earl and he [Mac Duinnsleibhe] gave Bairche to Ua Lochlainn [and] Ua Lochlainn gave it to [Donnchadh] Ua Cerbaill. And, moreover, there was given a townland to the clergy of Saball, by reason of the prosperity of the reign of Ua Lochlainn."
1166 Ulster "Cucuach Mac Gilla-espuic was killed by Donnsleibhe, grandson of Eochaidh [Ua Eochadha]."
1166 Tigernach "And while he was in the kindred of Conall, Ua Ruairc and the men of Breifne and Conmaicne and Oriel and Ua Ruairc's army invaded Tyrone, so the kindred of Eoghan, including Muircheartach son of Mac Lochlainn, overking of Ireland, gathered against them to the woods of Ua­ Eachach, and delivered a battle-onset upon the; and the kindred of Eogan were routed, and Muircheartach son of Niall Mac Lochlainn, overking of Ireland, is killed, and sixteen of the choicest of his people. And the clerics of the Bell of the Bequest were killed there, and the Ua­ Briain carried off the bell. It was Ua Flainn, of the Ua­ Briain, that killed the king, and by the miracles of St Patrick he was killed, St Patrick's successor and the clerics of Ireland having been outraged by him concerning Ua hEochadha i.e. Eochaidh son of Donnsleiibhe, king of Ulster who was blinded by Muircheartach son of Mac Lochlainn, in despite of those clerics, and while he was under the safeguard of Ua Cearbhaill, king of Oriel. And for that reason the men of Ulster and Oriel revolted against Muircheartach."
1166 Four Masters Macraith Ua Morain resigned his bishopric; and Gillachrist Ua hEochaidh was afterwards appointed to the chair of Conmhaicne.
1166 Inisfallen Eochaid son of Donn Sléibe Ua hEochada, king of Ulaid, was blinded by the son of Mac Lochlainn.
1166 Ulster "Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] was blinded by Muircertach Ua Lochlainn, in violation of the protection of the successor of Patrick and of the Staff of Jesus and of Donnchadh Ua Cerbaill, namely, the arch-king of Airgialla."
1166 Four Masters "Eochaidh Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua Eochadha, pillar of the prowess and hospitality of the Irish, was blinded by Muircheartach Ua Lochlainn; and the three best men of the Dá-Araidhe, i.e. two Mac Loingsighs, and the grandson of Cathasach Ua Flathrae, were killed by the same king, in violation of the protection of the successor of Patrick and the Staff of Jesus; of Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and in violation of the protection of the relics, laity, and clergy of all the north of Ireland."
1166 Ulster "A hosting by Donnchadh Ua Cerbaill, with the Airghialla and with the Ui-Briuin and the Conmaicni, into Tir-Eogain, to attack Ua Lochlainn, by direction of the Cenel-Eogain themselves, in consequence of Ua Lochlainn, arch-king of Ireland, being abandoned by them. So that [Ua Lochlainn] came, with a small party of the Cenel-Eogain of Telach-og, to deliver an assault upon them at Fidh-O-nEchtach. And even those very men, they abandoned him. So there fell in that place Muircertach (son of Niall) Ua Lachlainn, arch-king of Ireland. And he was the Augustus of all the North-West of Europe for valour and championship. And a few of Cenel-Eogain were killed there, namely, thirteen men. A great marvel and wonderful deed was done then: to wit, the king of Ireland to fall without battle, without contest, after his dishonouring the successor of Patrick and the Staff of Jesus and the successor of Colum-cille and the Gospel of Martin and many clergy besides [by blinding Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua Eochadha]. Howbeit, his body was carried to Ard-Macha and buried there, in dishonour of the successor of Colum-cille with his Community and Colum-cille himself and the head of the students of Daire fasted regarding it, for his being carried to [Christian] burial."
1167 Tigernach "A hosting by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, overking of Ireland, and by Ireland's kingfolk, that is, Diarmaid Mac Carrthaigh, king of Desmond, and Muircheartach Ua Briain, king of Da¡l Cais, and the kingfolk of Leinster and Ossory with their great muster, and Diarmaid Ua Maelseachlainn, king of Meath and Tighearna¡n Ua Ruairc, king of the Ua­ Briain and Conmaicne, and Ua Cearbhaill, king of Oriel, and Ua hEochadha, king of Ulster, with his large gathering, and all those kings on one road. Thirteen battalions they were, of footsoldiers and seven of cavalry, and they reached Armagh, and three nights they spent there waiting for Cenall Conaill and the great fleet that came round Ireland until they reached the harbour of Derry, and they went by sea and by land throughout the Kindred of Eoghan, under cliffs and woods. And the Kindred of Eoghan assemple to deliver a camp attack on the men of Ireland, but hence, having divided it, it resulted that each division killed the other at night in error. However, on the morrow they gave eight hostages to the king of Ireland, Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair, and he left four of these hostages in the custody of Ua Cearbhaill, king of Oriel, protecting them, and Ruaidhrí himself came into Connacht, bringing the four other hostages. And each of the provincial kings returned to his own country. And the king of Ireland came along Tyrconnell and over Assaroe into Connacht, and he brought Ua Briain and Mac Carthaigh to his house, and gave Cormac's sword to Mac Carthaigh, and gave the drinking-horn of Toirrdhealbhach Ua Briain to Ua Briain's son."
1167 McCarthy Donnchadh son of Cú Chaisil Ó Cearbhaill, high-king of Oirghialla, who obtained the kingship of Midhe as far as Clochán na hImrime, and the kingship of Ulaidh, and to whom was offered many times the kingship of Cinéal Eóghain, chief ornament of the north of Ireland, and even of all Ireland, for appearance, wisdom, bravery, friendship, brotherliness, vigour, kingship, power, for bestowing treasure, food, bounty, and reward to laymen and clergy, for overwhelming all evil and exalting all goodness, for protecting bells, croziers, and the monasteries of canons and monks, and like unto Solomon for peacefulness in his own native territory and towards every territory around, died after repentance, having bequeathed much gold, silver, and stock, and having partaken of the Body of Christ.
1167 Four Masters "A great meeting was convened by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair and the chiefs of Leath-Chuinn, both lay and ecclesiastic, and the chiefs of the foreigners at Ath-buidhe-Tlachtgha. To it came the successor of Patrick; Cadhla Ua Dubhthaigh, Archbishop of Connaught; Lorcan Ua Tuathail, Archbishop of Leinster; Tighearnan Ua Ruairc, lord of Breifne; Donnchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia; Diarmaid Ua Maeleachlainn, King of Teamhair; Raghnall, son of Raghnall, lord of the foreigners. The whole of their gathering and assemblage was thirteen thousand horsemen, of which six thousand were Connaughtmen, four thousand with O'Ruairc, two thousand with Ua Maeleachlainn, four thousand with Ua Cearbhaill and Ua hEochadha, two thousand with Donnchadh Mac Fhaelain, one thousand with the Danes of Ath-cliath. They passed many good resolutions at this meeting, respecting veneration for churches and clerics, and control of tribes and territories, so that women used to traverse Ireland alone; and a restoration of his prey was made by the Ui-Failghe at the hands of the kings aforesaid. They afterwards separated in peace and amity, without battle or controversy, or without any one complaining of another at that meeting, in consequence of the prosperousness of the king, who had assembled these chiefs with their forces at one place."
1169 Four Masters "An army of the men of Ireland was led by Ruaidhri Ua Conchobhair to Teamair; and the chiefs of the north of Ireland came to meet him, together with Maghnus Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla; and they went from thence to Ath-cliath, and returned home again."
1170 Loch Ce A great, ungenerous deed was committed by the monk, son of the comarb of Finnen of Magh-bile, and by Maghnus, son of Donnsleibhe, king of Uladh, with the chieftains of Uladh, and the Ulidians besides except Bishop Maelisa, and Gilladomhaingairt, son of Cormac, comarb of Comhgall, and Maelmartain, comarb of Finnen, with their fraternities viz., a community of regular canons, with their abbot, whom Maelmaedhog Ua Morghair, legate of the comarb of Peter, had ordained at Sabhall-Patraic, were expelled from the monastery which they themselves had erected; (and they were entirely lundered both in books and utensils, people, horses, and sheep, and all things which they had collected there from the time of the aforesaid legate until then, except the tunics and the capes which were about them in that hour), through envy and carnal love, and greed of honour for himself; as the monks of Droiched-Atha had expelled him from their abbacy for lawful reasons. Alas! alas! truly; woe to them who committed it; and woe to the land in which the deed was committed; but, however, it did not escape long without the vengeanee of the Lord, for the chieftains who committed it were slain together by a few enemies; and the king was wounded, and unluckily slain a short time after, in the place where this unjust resolution had been adopted, viz., in Dún. On Tuesday the community was expelled; on Tuesday, also, before the end of a year, the chieftains of Uladh were slain, and the king was wounded.
1170 Ulster "A great, unbecoming deed was done by the monk, namely, by Amlaimh, son of the successor of [St.] Finnian of Magh-bile and by Maghnus Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha], king of Ulidia, along with the chiefs of Ulidia and with the Ulidians besides, except the bishop, Mael-Isu and Gilla-Domanghairt Mac Cormaic, successor of [St.] Comgall and Mael-Martain, successor of [St.] Finnian, with their communities: that is, the Congregation of Canons Regular, with their abbot, whom Mael-Moedoic Ua Morgair, Legate of the successor of [St.] Peter, instituted in Saball of [St.] Patrick, were expelled out of the monastery they themselves built and were despoiled completely, both of books and furniture, cows and persons, horses and sheep and all things they had collected therein from the time of the Legate aforesaid to then, save the tunics and the capes which were upon them at that hour, through carnal jealousy and self-love and desire of honour for himself. For the monks of Drochait-atha deposed him from the abbacy [of Saball] for just causes. Alas! alas! alas! in sooth. Woe who did and woe the country wherein was done the deed. But it went not without vengeance from the Lord; for the chiefs who did it were killed at one and the same time by a few enemies and the king was wounded and killed unhappily a little while after, in the place wherein that unrighteous counsel was decided upon, namely, in Dun. Now, on Tuesday the Congregation was expelled; on Tuesday, at the end of a year, the nobles of Ulidia were killed and the king was wounded; on Tuesday, a little after, he himself was killed by his brother in Dun."
1170 Four Masters "An unknown, atrocious deed was committed by Maghnus Ua hEochadha, King of Ulidia, and the monk Amhlaeibh, son of the successor of Finnen, and by the Ulidians in general, except Maelisa, bishop, and Gilladomhangairt, son of Cormac, successor of Comhghall, and Maelmartain, successor of Finnen, with their people, i.e. a convent of religious monks, with their abbot, whom Maelmaedhog Ua Morgair, legate of the successor of Peter, had appointed at Sabhall-Phadraig, were expelled from the monastery, which they themselves had founded and erected; and they were all plundered, both of their books and ecclesiastical furniture, cows, horses, and sheep, and of every thing which they had collected from the time of the legate aforesaid till then. Wo to the lord and chieftains who perpetrated this deed, at the instigation of one whom the monks of Droichet-atha Drogheda had expelled from the abbacy for his own crime. Wo to the country in which it was perpetrated; and it did not pass without vengeance from the Lord, for the chieftains who had done this deed were slain together by a few enemies, and the king was prematurely wounded and slain, shortly after, at the town where the unjust resolution of perpetrating it had been adopted, namely, at Dun. On Tuesday the convent were expelled. On Tuesday also, at the end of a year, the chieftains of Ulidia were slain, and the king was wounded. On Tuesday, shortly after, he was killed by his brother, at Dun."
1171 McCarthy Maghnus son of Cú Uladh son of Conchobhar [Mac Duinn Shléibhe] king of Ulaidh, was killed by his own brother, Donn Sleibhe.
1171 Ulster "Great foraying force [was led] by Maghnus Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] with all Ulidia into Cuil-in-tuaisceirt, so that they plundered Cuil-rathain and other churches, until a small number of the Cenel-Eogain under Conchobur Ua Cathain overtook them and gave battle and killed one and twenty men, both chiefs and sons of chiefs, and a multitude of others along with them. And Maghnus himself was wounded. And moreover that Maghnus was killed shortly after in Dun by Donnsleibhe, that is, by his own brother and by Gilla-Oenghusa Mac Gilla-espuic, namely, by the lawgiver of Monaigh, after great evils had been done by him, namely, after leaving his own wedded wife and after taking his wife from his fosterer, that is, from Cu-maighi Ua Flainn and she [had been] the wife of his own brother at first, namely, of Aedh; after inflicting violence upon the wife of his other brother also, that is, of Eochaidh; after profanation of bells and croziers, clerics and churches. Donnsleibhe took the kingship in his stead."
1171 Ulster "Ane, daughter of the Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] queen of Airghialla, died."
1171 Loch Ce Venit in Hiberniam Henricus potentissimus rex Angliae, et idem dux Normanniae et Aquitaniae, et comes Andegaviae, et aliarum multarum terrarum dominus, cum ducentis .XL. navibus; and he came on shore at Port-Lairge, and took the hostages of Mumha; and he came afterwards to Ath-cliath, and took the hostages of Laighen, and of the men of Midhe, and the Uí-Briuin, and Oirghialla, and Uladh.
1171 Four Masters "A plundering fleet was brought by the Ulidians into Tir-Eoghain, in which they carried off a countless number of cows."
1171 Tigernach "Maghnus Ua hEochadha, king of Ulaid, was killed by his own brother."
1171 Four Masters "A predatory incursion was made by Niall, son of Mac Lochlainn, and the Cinel-Eoghain, into Ulidia, and numbers were slain by them; and they carried off countless cows."
1171 Loch Ce Petrus, bishop of the Uí-Maine of Connacht, a pious monk, and a man of authority, was drowned in the Sinuinn on the 6th of the kalends of January. great preying expedition by Maghnus, son of Donnsleibhe, with all the Ulidians, into Cuil-an-tuaisceirt, when they plundered Cul-rathain and other churches; but a small party of the Cenel-Eoghain, with Conchobhar Ua Cathain, overtook them, and gave them battle, and killed twenty-two persons, between chieftains and sons of chieftains, and many others along with them; and Maghnus himself was wounded; and this Maghnus, moreover, was slain soon after by Donnsleibhe, i.e. his own brother, and by Gilla-Aenghusa, son of Gilla-Espuic, viz.: the rector of Monach-an-Dúin, after he had committed manty great crimes; i.e. after abandoning his own married wife, and after carrying off the wife of his tutor, i.e. Cumhuighe Ua Floinn, (and she had been possessed by his own brother, Aedh, at first); after having offered violence to the wife of his other brother, i.e. Eochaidh; after profaning bells and bachalls, clerics and churches.
1171 Ulster "There came into Ireland Henry (son of the Empress), most puissant king of England and also Duke of Normandy and Aquitaine and Count of Anjou and Lord of many other lands, with 240 ships. (So that that was the first advent of the Saxons into Ireland.) And he came to land at Port-lairgi and received the pledges of Munster. He came after that to Ath-cliath and received the pledges of Leinster and of the Men of Meath and of the Ui-Briuin and Airgialla and Ulidia."
1171 Four Masters "A great predatory force was led by Maghnus Mac Duinnsleibhe Ua hEochadha and the Ulidians into Cuil-an-tuais-ceirt; and they plundered Cuil-rathain Coleraine and other churches. A small party of the Cinel-Eoghain, under Conchobhair Ua Cathain, overtook them; and a battle was fought between them, in which the Ulidians were defeated, with the loss of one-and-twenty chieftains and sons of chieftains, with many others of the commonalty; and Maghnus himself was wounded, but he escaped from the conflict on that occasion. He was afterwards killed by his own brother, Donnsleibhe, and Gilla-Aenghusa, son of Mac Gillaepscoip, ruler of Monaigh at Dun Downpatrick, after having perpetrated many evil deeds."
1171 Tigernach "The Earl went into England to meet Henry, king of England, and Henry arrived in Ireland at Waterford a week before Samhain, and Diarmaid Mac Carthaigh, king of Desmond, submitted to him. Thence he went to Dublin and received the kingship of Leinster and of the men of Meath, Brefne, Oriel and Ulster."
1171 Four Masters "The daughter of Ua hEochadha, and wife of Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, lord of Oirghialla, died."
1172 McCarthy The Pope at that time was Alexander III, the Emperor was Frederick [Barbarossa], and Louis [VII] was King of France: Ruaidhrí son of Toirdhealbhach son of Ruaidhrí Ó Conchobhair was over Ireland. Aodh Ó Néill over Cinéal Eóghain and the whole province. Donn Sléibhe son of Cú Uladh son of Conchobhar [Mac Duinn Shléibhe] over the Ulaidh. Domhnall Mór son of Toirdhealbhach son of Diarmaid son of Toirdhealbhach son of Tadhg son of Brian Bóramha over Thomond and one of the two provinces of Munster. Diarmaid son of Cormac son of Muireadheach Mac Carthaigh over the other province. Donnchadh son of Cian son of Donnchadh Donn son of Cú Mara son of Brodchú son of Mathghamhain son of Cian son of Maol Muaidh [Ó Mathghamhna] over Uí Eachach. Lochlainn Ó Mic Thíre over Uí Mac Caille. Maol Seachlainn Ó Faoláin over Déise. Domhnall Ó Giolla Phádraig over Osraighe. Domhnall Caomhánach son of Mac Murchadha over Leinster. Murchadh son of Donnchadh son of Cú Chaisil Ó Cearbhaill over Oirghialla and the men of Fearnmhagh. Dornhnall son of Maol Seachlainn Crosach [Ó Maoil Sheachlainn] over Oirthear Midhe. Tighearnán Ó Ruairc over Gairbhthrian Connacht, and he was called King of Midhe.
1172 McCarthy Tighearnán Ó Ruairc, Murchadh son of Donnchadh Ó Cearbhaill, and Donn Sléibhe [Mac Duinn Shléibhe], king of Ulaidh, came into the house of the King at Dublin and made submission to him.
1172 Ulster "Mael-Muire Mac Murchadha, chief of Muinnter-Birn and chief and king of the Ui-Echach, was killed by Aedh Mac Oenghusa and by the Clann-Aedha of the Ui-Echach of Ulidia."
1172 Four Masters "Mac Giolla Epscoip, chief of Clann-Aeilabhra, legislator of Cath Monaigh, was treacherously slain by Donslevy O'Haughy, king of Ulidia. The chiefs of Ulidia, who were as guarantees between them, put Donslevy to death for it i.e. for his crime ."
1172 Tigernach "The son of Giolla Easpaig, chief of Clann Ailebra, steward of Cath Monaig, was treacherously killed by Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha, king of the Ulaid, wherefore the guarantors that were between them, i.e. the nobles of Ulster, put him to death."
1173 Tigernach "Donnsliabhe king of Ulster, was killed by the Ui Eachach Ulad and by his own brother."
1173 McCarthy Dorm Sléibhe son of Cú Uladh son of Conchobhar Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh, was killed by Uí Eachach, Uí Bhreasail, and Uí Niallain, with great slaughter of the Ulaidh, to avenge the killing of Mac Giolla Easpuig in violation of the relics and clergy of the north of Ireland a fortnight before that.
1173 McCarthy Ruaidhrí son of Cú Uladh [Mac Duinn Shléibhe] took the kingship of Ulaidh, and Niall son of Cú Uladh, his own brother, was blinded by him.
1176 McCarthy A hosting by Maol Sheachlainn Ó Lochlainn, king of Cinéal Eóghain, into Ulaidh, and he carried off their hostages.
1177 Ulster "Dun-da-lethglas was destroyed by John De Courcy and by the knights that came with him, and a castle was made by them there, wherefrom they twice inflicted defeat upon Ulidia and defeat upon Cenel-Eogain and upon Airgialla; where was killed Conchobur Ua Cairella[i]n (namely, chief of Clann-Diarmata) and Gilla Mac Liac Ua Donngaille, chief of Fir-Droma, and wherein was wounded with arrows Domnall Ua [F]laithbertaigh and he died of those wounds in the monastery [of Canons Regular] of Paul [and Peter] in Ard-Macha, after partaking of the Body of Christ and after his anointing and wherein were killed many other nobles. Now, Conchobur Ua Cairella[i]n before that (namely, in the Spring) inflicted defeat upon the Cenel-Eogain and upon Ua Maeldoraidh; where a great number of the Cenel-Eogain were killed, around the son of Mac Sherraigh and around many nobles besides."
1177 Four Masters "An army was led by John De Courcy and the knights into Dáaradia and to Dun da leathghlas; they slew Donnell, the grandson of Cathasach, Lord of Dáaradia. Dun da leathghlas was plundered and destroyed by John and the knights who came in his army. A castle was erected by them there, out of which they defeated the Ulidians twice, and the Kinel-Owen and Oriels once, slew Conor O'Carellan, chief of Clandermot, and Gilla-Macliag O'Donnelly, chief of Feardroma; and Donnell O'Flaherty now Laverty was so wounded by arrows on this occasion, that he died of his wounds in the church of St. Paul at Armagh, after having received the body and blood of Christ, and after extreme unction and penance. Many other chieftains were also slain by them besides these. During the same expedition, John De Courcy proceeded with his forces to Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee; before his arrival, however, Cumee O'Flynn had set Armoy on fire; but they burned Coleraine and many other churches on this incursion."
1177 Tigernach "John de Courcy went to Downpatrick, and the town was destroyed by him, and the whole of Ulaid was destroyed by him; but therin a defeat was inflicted upon him, and the nobles of his people were slain, and he himself was taken prisoner."
1177 Tigernach "A defeat inflicted on the Kindred of Eoghan and the Ulaid by the Foreigners of Downpatrick, and Conchobhar Ua Caireall¡in was the best that fell there."
1178 McCarthy A.D. 1178. The valiant knight John de Courcy came secretly with a band of knights and archers from Dublin to Downpatrick, and reaching it unperceived, they made a dyke from sea to sea about Downpatrick. The Ulaidh then assembled, under Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, to make an attack on Downpatrick against John, but on reaching it they retreated without striking a blow when they saw the Englishmen with their horses in full battle-dress. When the Englishmen saw the Ulaidh in flight, they followed them with their people, and inflicted slaughter upon them, both by drowning and by the sword. The Bachall Fínghin and Bachall Rónáin Fhinn and many other relics were left behind in that slaughter.
1178 McCarthy A hosting by Maol Sheachlainn Ó Lochlainn with Cinéal Eóghain, Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe with the Ulaidh, Giolla an Choimdhe Ó Caráin, Patrick's coarb, having with them the relics of the north of Ireland, together with their clerical keepers to Downpatrick to capture it from John [de Courcy]. When they reached it, they fled without striking a blow, leaving behind Patrick's coarb with his clergy, and the Canóin Pádraig, Fionn Faoidheach Pádraig, Clog Timchill Arda Macha, Bachall Comhghaill, Ceolán Tighearnaigh, Bachall Da-Chiaróg Argail, Bachall Eimhine, Bachall Mhura, and many other relics. There fell there Domhnall Ó Flaithbheartaigh, chieftain of Clann Fhlaithbheartaigh, Conchobhar Ó Ciaralláin, chieftain of Clann Diarmada, Giolla Mic Liag Ó Donnghaile, chieftain of Fir Dhroma, Giolla Criost Ó hAdhmaill, chieftain of Clann Adhmaill, Giolla Mártain Mac Con Allaidh, chieftain of Clann Chonchadha, Giolla Comhghaill Mac Tiúlacáin, chieftain of Muinntear Mhongáin, Cionaoth Mac Cartáin, chieftain of Cinéal Faghartaigh, and many others who cannot be reckoned here. Patrick's coarb was captured, but was released by the English of their own accord, and the Canóin Pádraig and the Ceolán Tighearnaigh were brought back from the Galls, after they had been found in the slaughter, when their young keepers were killed. The Galls have all the other relics still.
1178 Four Masters "Gilchreest O'Hoey, bishop of Conmaicne Ardagh, died."
1178 Ulster "It is in that year likewise went John [De Courcy], with his knights, pillaging from Dun to the Plain of Conaille, so that they took many preys therein and were a night in camp in Glenn-righi. Howbeit, Murchadh Ua Cerbaill, king of Airgialla, and Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha], king of Ulidia, with the Ulidians came up with them that night and made an onset upon them. Thereupon defeat was inflicted upon the Foreigners and stark slaughter was put upon them. The same John, notwithstanding, went for preys into Dá-Araidhe and into Ui-Tuirtri. But Cu-Midhe Ua Flainn, king of Ui-Tuirtri and Fir-Li, made an onset upon theme. That battle also went against the Foreigners and slaughter of them was inflicted."
1178 Four Masters "John De Courcy with his foreigners repaired to Machaire Conaille, and committed depredations there. They encamped for a night in Glenree, where Murrough O'Carroll, Lord of Oriel, and Cooley Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, made a hostile attack upon them, and drowned and otherwise killed four hundred and fifty of them. One hundred of the Irish, together with O'Hanvy, Lord of Hy-Meith-Macha, fell in the heat of the battle."
1178 Loch Ce Murchadh O'Cerbhaill, king of Oirghiall, and Mac Duinnsleibhe, i.e. the king of Uladh, came to them, however, on that night, and gave him battle.
1178 Ulster (The attack of Cualnge [was gained] by Ulidians and by Foreigners over John De Courcy.
1178 Four Masters "John De Courcy soon after proceeded to plunder Dáaradia and Hy-Tuirtre; and Cumee O'Flynn, Lord of Hy-Tuirtre and Firlee, gave battle to him and his foreigners, and defeated them with great slaughter, through the miracles of Patrick, Columbkille, and Brendan; and John himself escaped with difficulty, being severely wounded, and fled to Dublin."
1178 McCarthy Lane Rónáin Fhinn, chief sanctuary of all Ulaidh, was plundered by John de Courcy, and Tomas Ó Corcráin, its erenach, was beheaded.
1178 Tigernach "A battle between the Foreigners and the Ulaid and the men of Oriel at Newry, and the Foreigners were routed, and 450 of them fell there, and a hundred Gaels in the counterflow of that battle, including Ua hAinbith, king of Ua­ Meith, Murchadh Ua Cearbhaill, king of Oriel, and Ruaidhrí son of Donnsliabhe Ua hEochadha were victors."
1178 Tigernach "The Foreigners who dwelt in Downpatrick were exterminated by the kindred of Eoghan and by the Ulaid and the men of Oriel, through the miracles of Ss Patrick, Columcill and Branainn."
1179 McCarthy Ulaidh was laid waste, both church and lay property, by John de Courcy and the Irish who were along with him.
1179 McCarthy Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh, in exile in Tír Eóghain.
1181 Ulster "A hosting by Domnall, son of Aedh Ua Lochlainn and by the Cenel-Eogain of Telach-oc into Ulidia and they gained a battle over the Ulidians and over Ui-Tuirtri and over Fir-Li, around Ruaidhri Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] and around Cu-Midhe Ua Flainn."
1181 Four Masters "Donnell, the son of Hugh Mac Loughlin, and the Kinel-Owen of Tullaghoge, made an incursion into Ulidia, and defeated the Ulidians, the Hy-Tuirtre, and the Firlee, together with Rory Mac Donslevy, and Cumee O'Flynn."
1182 McCarthy A.D. 1182. A defeat of the Ulaidh, under Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, by Domhnall Ó Maoil Sheachlainn, king of Cinéal Eóghain.
1189 Four Masters "Alas for the party who plotted this conspiracy against the life of the heir presumptive to the throne of Ireland! To him the greater part of Leth-Mhogha had submitted as king. Donnell O'Brien had gone to his house at Dunlo, where he was entertained for a week; and O'Conor gave him sixty cows out of every cantred in Connaught, and ten articles ornamented with gold; but O'Brien did not accept of any of these, save one goblet, which had once been the property of Dermot O'Brien, his own grandfather. Rory Mac Donslevy, King of Ulidia, had gone to his house. Mac Carthy, King of Desmond, was in his house, and O'Conor gave him a great stipend, namely, five horses out of every cantred in Connaught. Melaghlin Beg, king of Tara, was in his house and took away a large stipend; and O'Rourke had gone to his house, and also carried with him a great stipend."
1192 McCarthy Conchobhar son of Maghnus Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh, was killed at Armagh by Ardghal Ó hAnluain, king of Uí Nialláin.
1194 Four Masters "Conor, son of Manus, who was son of Donslevy O'Haughey, was treacherously slain by O'Hanlon."
1195 Ulster Sitriuc Ua Gailmredhaigh was killed by [Maghnus] Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha].
1195 Four Masters Sitric O'Gormly was slain by Mac Donslevy.
1196 McCarthy The churches of Tír Eóghain were plundered and laid waste by Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh. The churches of Domhnach Mór, the refectory of Cruimthear Coluim, the church of Doire Loráin, and Tearmann Comáin were plundered, and the church of Díseart Dá Chríoch was burned.
1196 Ulster "A hosting by Ruaidhri Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] with the Foreigners and with the sons of the kings of Connacht to Cenel-Eogain and the Airthir. Howbeit, the Cenel-Eogain of Telach-oc and the Airthir came to the Plain of Ard-Macha and gave them battle and defeat was inflicted upon Mac Duinnsleibe and stark slaughter of his people took place there, namely, twelve sons of the kings of Connacht."
1196 Four Masters "Rory Mac Donslevy, with the English, and the sons of the chieftains of Connaught, marched an army against the Kinel-Owen and Oriors. The Kinel-Owen of Tulloghoge and the men of Orior proceeded to the plain of Armagh to oppose them, and there gave them battle. Mac Donslevy was defeated with dreadful slaughter; and twelve of the sons of the lords and chieftains of Connaught, with many of an inferior grade, were slain. Among the chieftains slain were Brian Boy O'Flaherty; the son of Maelisa O'Conor, of Connaught; the son of O'Conor Faly; and the son of O'Faelain (Phelan), of the Desies."
1196 McCarthy Defeat and slaughter [were inflicted] by Cinéal Eóghain and the Oirthir on Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, king of Ulaidh, near Armagh.
1199 Four Masters "Rory O'Donslevy, and some of the English of Meath, mustered a body of troops, and plundered the Monastery of SS. Peter and Paul (at Armagh), and left only one cow there."
1200 Ulster "A foray by Ruaidhri Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochadha] with some of the Foreigners of Meath, so that they pillaged the Monastery of Paul and Peter [in Armagh] until they left not therein but one cow."
1200 McCarthy A foray by Ruaidhrí [Mac Duinn Shléibhe] with the Galls of Ardee against Armagh. He made another foray against Inis Caoin Deagha Mic Cairill and plundered the town and its church.
1201 Ulster "Ruaidhri Mac Duinnsleibhe [Ua Eochada], king of Ulidia and candle of championship of all Ireland, was killed by the Foreigners, to wit, through the miracles of Paul and Peter and Patrick whom he dishonoured."
1201 McCarthy Ruaidhrí Mac Duinn Shléibhe, late king of Ulaidh, was killed by a few of the followers of John de Courcy.
1201 McCarthy John de Courcy and the Galls of Ulaidh and Midhe [were] in Connacht with Cathal Croibhdhearg son of Toirdhealbhach to recover his kingship. Defeat and slaughter [were inflicted] by Cathal son of Conchobhar Maonmhuighe and the Connachtmen on that force, and John went eastwards across Loch Rí and the family of Hugo de Lacy took him prisoner, and hostages of the nobility of the Galls of Ulaidh had to be given for him. That was the defeat of An Forbhar.
1204 McCarthy A.D. 1204. John de Courcy came with the Cinéal Eóghain from the north into Ulaidh to recover his lordship. Walter de Lacy with a force from Midhe came from the south against him, and between them they ravaged Ulaidh.
1204 Ulster "A hosting by Ugo the son of Ugo De Lacy with a force of Foreigners of Meath into Ulidia, so that they expelled John De Courcy out of Ulidia."
1205 Ulster "John De Courcy, destroyer of the churches and territories of Ireland, was expelled by Ugo the son of Ugo De Lacy into Tir-Eogain, to the protection of Cenel-Eogain."
1208 Four Masters "Duvinnsi Magennis, Lord of Clann-Aodha, in Iveagh, was slain by the son of Donslevy O'Haughy."
1227 Ulster "Cumara Ua Domnallain was killed in captivity by Ruaidhri Mac Duinnsleibhe, in revenge of his father, he Cumara being crossed as a Crusader."

All of the photographs and information about the three generations of the Hoy family on these pages has been gathered by Bob Hoy of Arlington, VA. The information for the book "Story of the Hoy Family" was compiled by Bob Hoy and the artwork was done by Lou Smull. Bob is the son of Frank Hoy from the second generation born in this country and Lou is the grandson of Frank's brother Tom.